Hand planer...

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message wrote:

Back before I could afford my first Lee Valley plane, a friend suggested at least upgrading my Buck and Stanley planes from the BORG with decent blades from either Lee Valley or Garrett-Wade.
I started with my Stanley "Jack" plane, and replacement blade cost about as much as the plane originally did. But, man did it take and hold an edge! I did the others as my budget permitted, and had no regrets.
I still have most of them, but ever so slowly the LV's are taking over.
Len
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

To start with, you can do almost any basic planing with 2 tools- a Stanley #5 jack plane for surfacing and a small block plane for edging, end grain, etc. There are many varieties of block planes, but the Stanley #60 is one I like. Both tools are commonly available at flea markets and Ebay for around $25 each. Just make sure your jack plane is a vintage, pre-war version. I would also recommend one with a frog adjusting screw. Look on Patrick's Blood and Gore site for info: http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan1.htm . Of course, they will most likely be rusty and gunked up when you buy them. I always spend a couple hours sanding and filing the surfaces and lapping the iron to get it to acceptable condition before the first use. As I use the tool and become acquainted with it over time, I continue to refine it to the point where my old junk shop Stanley's are perfectly tuned to how I work, and wouldn't even trade up for a Lie-Nielson even if I had the offer (any offers??) After the first two I would get a scrub plane, a jointer plane, a fillister, a shoulder plane, a #4, a router plane and a few more block planes, almost in that order. -Brent
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

be more like $5 - $10 and the #5 about $15. So far the most I've paid for a used plane was $40 for a rust free No 7, can't remember the vintage. It was the only non baby clothes item the lady had and when she jumped on my counter offer to her $75 I knew I should have offered $30:-( I have passed on a lot of planes at higher prices, and bought a few junkers before I learned what to look for. Joe
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

To start with, you can do almost any basic planing with 2 tools- a Stanley #5 jack plane for surfacing and a small block plane for edging, end grain, etc. There are many varieties of block planes, but the Stanley #60 is one I like. Both tools are commonly available at flea markets and Ebay for around $25 each. Just make sure your jack plane is a vintage, pre-war version. I would also recommend one with a frog adjusting screw. Look on Patrick's Blood and Gore site for info: http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan1.htm . Of course, they will most likely be rusty and gunked up when you buy them. I always spend a couple hours sanding and filing the surfaces and lapping the iron to get it to acceptable condition before the first use. As I use the tool and become acquainted with it over time, I continue to refine it to the point where my old junk shop Stanley's are perfectly tuned to how I work, and wouldn't even trade up for a Lie-Nielson even if I had the offer (any offers??) After the first two I would get a scrub plane, a jointer plane, a fillister, a shoulder plane, a #4, a router plane and a few more block planes, almost in that order. -Brent
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