Gluing wood to glass


I am rebuilding some fixed windows where the sash has rotted. The sash on this window is 1 3/4" wide and 1/2" thick and is somehow edge glued to the windows (i.e., the narrow edge, about 1/2", is glued to the glass). I have been looking on the web for adhesives but I don't see anything that looks just right for this job.
Has anyone had to do this kind of work, and if so, would you mind sharing what you used?.
TIA.
Dick Snyder
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Dick Snyder wrote:

Araldite the expensive glue type,bonds to any two surfaces with good impact and inseperable after 24 hours.
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

oops! forgot the info. http://www.silmid.com/araldite/adhesives.htm
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

Does the sash need to be structurally fastened to the glass, or is it just for weather sealing?
I've seen some windows where the sash was glued to the surrounding wood, but between the sash and the glass it was just silicone.
Chris
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Window panes are seated into a sash (wooden, aluminum or whatever) with silicone. A double paned, argon filled panel has special adhesives to hold the panes together, but the double panes, as a unit, is still seated into the sash with silicone.
Grilles or other pane dividers can be attached with clips or is attached to the pane with double stick tape.
I'm not sure if you were referring to seating a pane into a sash rabbet or "glueing" (taping) a grille or divider onto a pane. Your 1/2" reference wasn't clear to me as to where, exactly, it is. Half-inch sounded like a grille/divider type piece to be attached, as well as being a rabbeted edge where the pane is seated onto the sash.
Sonny
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I have a double paned panel that is 60" x 16". . On the perimenter of the panel is some trim for lack of a better word that has a 1/2" thick edge that is attached to the panel. That trim is 1 3/4" wide and I believe its purpose it just for weather sealing rather than some structural purpose. The trim is attached to the outward facing glass of the panel right along the edge. If I am still not being clear I can post a picture on rec.woodworking.pictures
Dick

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The wood is sealed to the glass with silicone only. There most likely is or was a foam tape type cushion on the very outer edge of the glass, itself. This foam, when initially attaching the wood to the glass at the factory, assists in minimizing silicone squeeze-out and clean-up during manufacture.
When removing the original wood, if you haven't done this already, use a box knife with an extending blade, that extends 2", 3" is better. Extend the blade and cut the silicone between the wood and glass. Don't force the cutting of the silicone.... go nice and easy, a little at a time. Too much pressure and you can break the glass. It is easier to break than you may think when working near the edges. Don't try to pry up the wood from the glass. This can result in breaking of the glass, also. You just have to take your time and cut the silicone to detach the wood from the glass. This will take a long time to do, so be patient. Clean up the residual silicone with a straight razor blade.
There is a sealing material (a band of material), at the edge of the glass panels, that attaches the 2 panes together and seals the argon gas between the 2 panes. Be careful not to damage that inside seal, otherwise you may loose the vacuum between the glass panels. Don't store the unit (glass panels) on edge, if you need to delay work on the project. A slight chip of the edge of a pane may cause it to crack, later, if an unusual bind is placed on the unit during work on it. That vacumm glass is tender, so be careful and don't abuse it while the edges are exposed to potential damage. If you have some old carpet, use that as a work surface on your work bench. And once the panes' edges are exposed, be careful not to nick it with a haphazardly placed tool.
Sonny
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Good advice - thanks for taking the time to send it.
Dick

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It is for weather sealing.

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On Thu, 17 Aug 2006 05:55:36 -0400, "Dick Snyder"

I would think that wood and glass would expand and contract at different rates, so you wouldn't want a firm attachment. Silicone would allow for this difference while still adhering to both materials for a seal.
Bill
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RE: Subject
Silicone SUCKS.
It is a poor sealant and once you start using it, you have to stay with it.
3M 101 and SikaFlex 291 are both far superior to silicone and far easier to handle IMHO.
Lew
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After doing a little web browsing on the two products you mention it looks like they (or at least SikaFlex) might be hard to remove if when the wood I plan to apply the glass rots and must be replaced again. What do you think?
Dick

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Dick Snyder wrote:
> After doing a little web browsing on the two products you mention it looks > like they (or at least SikaFlex) might be hard to remove if when the wood I > plan to apply the glass rots and must be replaced again. What do you think?
I'd call SikaFlex tech service in metro Detroit on the 800#.
They are a sharp bunch.
Lew
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After doing a little web browsing on the two products you mention it looks like they (or at least SikaFlex) might be hard to remove if when the wood I plan to apply the glass rots and must be replaced again. What do you think?
Dick

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