Garage heat

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I would suggest 9' foot ceilings as a minimum. 4x8 sheet of plywood on the diagonal is 8.9'
I would bet at sometime you would have a piece of plywood up on its corner.
Consequently, I would suggest 10' ceilings since lumber and sheetrock are sold either in that length or multiples.
If it were my dime, then I would use 12' ceilings. It will keep a big room from feeling so closed in. Per my son the architect.
On Thu, 16 Dec 2004 09:39:53 -0800, Larry Jaques

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wrote:

On the downside it will not allow you to feel nice and cozy....
My shop btw is downright cozy.... too cozy....
LOL
Nice to see that today even your own son charges a dime.... used to be a nickle in my day....but my Dad was smart ...he never paid... Bob
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Bob G. wrote:

Nothin' says cozy like 6' ceilings.
--
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Silvan writes:

Nah. They say "Bring on the aspirin" because you'll be hitting your head.
Charlie Self "Political language... is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind." George Orwell
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On Tue, 21 Dec 2004 21:52:24 -0500, Silvan

Wouldn't our humps hit on those, Silvie? That's L O W !
-- Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life. ---- --Unknown
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I'd be kinda skittish about flames where gasoline fumes were present, unless I had really good fire insurance . . . maybe I'm overly cautious, I dunno . . . -Tock
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tock responds:

I agree, in part. I had a fire in the basement last year. I don't give a rat's ass how good your fire insurance is (mine was excellent), a fire is more than a slight inconvenience, even when everything is made "just like it was", which it can't be, of course.
Charlie Self "He has all the virtues I dislike and none of the vices I admire." Sir Winston Churchill
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Charlie Self wrote:

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Charlie,
Do you live in the city or the country? I built a 30 X 50 shop 2 years ago. I put in radiant floor heat, but not the wysbro it was electric cable. It heats offpeak @ 2.7 cents a kilowatt. Plus my rural electric company gave a 1500.00 rebate on top of that. I installed 2 zones because I use part of the shop for storing my lawn equip. ect. that way I can set the temp amywhere I want it. It costs me more to turn on the lights than to heat the whole place!!!
Hope this helps,
Fordguy
Charlie Self wrote:

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fordguy writes:

I lived in the city when I had the fire, back in the country now. We built a 25 x 48 shop here about 6 years ago. If I ever get the thermostat hooked up (tomorrow? But I've been saying that for 3 years), I'll have an overhead electric furnace on-line and working. Right now, I'm using infrared propane, 45,000 Btus. Radiant floor heat would have been nice, but I built that shop myself for less than 11 grand, so it wasn't in the picture. My current heating set-up cost me the price of a 60 amp breaker and some #6 cable, cheap thermostat, and a bit of metal work. I don't really know what the KW cost is here, but I promise, it's not 2.7 cents. More like 9, at a guess, plus fuel adjustments that will knock your panties into a knot.
I've got propane heat in the house and very much regret changing from oil. The first year the heat pump/propane was in place, my combined electrical and propane bill was more than double the preceding (cooler) year's costs. You save on furnace cleanings. You get screwed on the cost of the fuel which has been on an apparent near perpetual up-tick, at least around central VA, for several years now. I expect my heating bill this year to be about three and one half times what it was four years ago.
Charlie Self "He has all the virtues I dislike and none of the vices I admire." Sir Winston Churchill
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I don't really know what the KW cost is

I hear ya. It's closer to 11 in my neck of the woods.

Ouch. I feel your pain. I switched from Oil to NG a few years ago. For me, I think It was a wash, but it's so hard to tell. I suspect my home heating costs are close to doubling over the course of a decade with minimal inflation.
About 8 years ago, I remember buying fuel oil at 70 cents a gallon. I hear it's close to $2 now. The oil and NG costomer are taking it in the shorts too.
If it helps, you have company.
-Steve
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Stephen M. responds:

It doesn't really help. This upward sprint for prices of everything related to oil production is sooner or later going to have to affect the entire economy. It's not just transport and heat. Most of today's plastics--vinyl, Styrofoam, etc.--are based on oil, so construction costs have to rise to absorb that cost rise, as eventually do the prices of toys with cases and other parts formed of plastic, whether those toys be a cordless drill or an X box.
Currently, we've got our heat pump set high enough that the gas furnace only kicks on when it gets below 30 degs. F., here.
One distinct saving with gas: the furnace does not need cleaning and new needle valves every year, a service that had risen from about $50 17 years ago to over $100 a few years ago.
Charlie Self "He has all the virtues I dislike and none of the vices I admire." Sir Winston Churchill
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On 17 Dec 2004 15:04:23 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote: [snip]

usually switch off at about 10 degrees F . I'm fortunate enough to be on a load shed plan from the power company and pay about 3 cents per kwh for the heat pump. Never been shed in the winter that I'm aware of. Maybe the efficiencies balance out different with your higher power cost. Also have propane for alternate fuel.
-- John, in Minnesota
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John, in MN writes:

And maybe I'm getting screwed. Hard to tell. I was told that when the air is much below freezing, heat pump efficiency drops dramatically. I'll have to dig out some information on the thing, as we seldom get down to 10 degrees here, so a setting of, say, 20 or so if it is reasonably efficient, might prove a money saver when the guy in the rolling propane bottle pops down the drive.
We're supposed to have a guy coming out to check it fairly soon, so I'll ask him to show me how to re-set the temp and then I can test it.
Charlie Self "Absolute faith corrupts as absolutely as absolute power." Eric Hoffer
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My Father in Law had a ground water heat pump installed on his farm. It extracts its heat from ground water which is supposedly at 55 degrees year round. It was efficient but you had to return the water you extracted some distance away from the source to prevent the gradual lowering of the temp from your source. Not much of a problem if you have the land but a pretty big one if you don't.
On 18 Dec 2004 10:57:16 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

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On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 23:55:06 -0500, Ron wrote:

If it's a heat pump system, couldn't you also rig it to lower air conditioning costs in the summer ?
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GregP asks:

Naturally.
Charlie Self "It is when power is wedded to chronic fear that it becomes formidable." Eric Hoffer
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On 18 Dec 2004 10:57:16 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote: [snip]

Charlie, I did a temp plot last night of the heat pump. It started to lose ground at about 10 deg. About 30 minutes later it switched over to the propane furnace. We had 9 below last night. At 20 degrees your pump should be happy. The manual for mine specs down to 0 for outside operating temp. Also the measured power on ours is about 2200 watts. So it only costs about 7 cents per hour of run time. -- John, in Minnesota
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On Sun, 19 Dec 2004 12:50:57 -0600, "John, in MN"

IF I only had more ground water.... lol...
If I did I would sink 2 wells and install a water to air heat pump , pulling water out of one well then putting it back in teh other...
Ground water her in Mid to Western Maryland is a constant 55 degrees year round... just about the perfect difference from the desired room tempature...
Got to be some reason Water to Air heat pumps are not the "thing"...
Oh well... house is total electric baseboard heat.... see the meter spin!...Shop is heated with a Propane furnace... watch the guade drop ... Bob
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I think it has something to do with the ~$20,000 it takes to install one! Greg
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