For those of you in the south that got heavy snow accumulations

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I found exactly the opposite, yesterday. People were so scared they wouldn't move. They drove too *slow* (as in stopped) and the snow under them turned to ice. There wasn't a chance to blow lanes clear of pack the snow before it turned to ice. People stopped at the bottom of hills. They're probably still there.
The other big problem is that there are no Winter tires here (myself included) and many are running slicks.
Then there are the truly stupid, like the guy that did a 3-point U-turn in front of me, into a driveway that was declined about 5' in 40'. Of course he was driving a 2WD pickup with no weight in the back. I was also driving a pickup (no weight) but I have good tires and was smart enough to pick the next driveway (flat). Some bozo couldn't even manage that driveway and drove over the person's lawn to get out.

Their trucks don't looks especially good for snow; top and front heavy, with RWD.

I tell people that the "shoulder is your friend" but here there are many places there is no shoulder, only a 20' drop to the woods below.
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On 01/29/2014 03:59 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Yep, got behind one going so slow that there was no way they were going to make it over the next hill, I found a nice place to pull over and waited until they were out of the picture before going on.

I do have good mud/snow tires, it helps.

usable shoulders.
basilisk
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wrote:

Same thing happened tonight on the way home (two days after the snow). Some moron got stuck on the same hill and cops had the road blocked off. I had to drive ~10Mi around. There is still a lot of ice around, where the sun couldn't get at it.

I don't. It's a new truck so has new tires but it does get a little goosy going up slick hills. My wife has been stuck at home since Monday and is about to go over the wall. I went into work at noon and called back to tell her to forget it.
<...>
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On 1/29/2014 3:59 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote: ...

That's the problem w/ large portions east of the Mississippi...we're flat (a hill means can't see most all of a passenger car coming, a "big" hill means the combine instead :) ). There's a nice bar ditch along that stretch of highway but narrow shoulders; fortunately it is 3-lane paved and the other guy was under control enough give me enough clearance to get across the turn before he got there---he could also see what was happening and waved me across when he saw me hesitate for the frac I wasn't sure which to try...
The really irritating part is the out-of-control guy was nearly a full half-mile away when I got on in front of him just leaving the light at the intersection where the two highways cross. I turned my signal blinker on while he still had most of that left to modulate with probably 3/8-ths of a mile to go to let him know to time his arrival appropriately. He _still_ hammered it and was over the posted dry- condition 45 mph limit by the time he was nearing I'm sure...not all "pros" are (or at least in any way other than the pay).
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"basilisk" wrote in message

Last Wednesday morning one of those drivers got stuck on the railroad tracks just north of Gainesville... the AMTRAK train I was on hit the car shortly after the driver abandoned it. Net result was a tow truck was needed to pull the car out of the front of the train and we had a 2 hour 20 minute delay... I saw thousands of abandoned and trapped cars... 3-5 lane wide parking lots that went on for mile after mile! Glad we skirted most of the problems... ran into some closed roads though as so many cars were abandoned that they were blocked to further traffic. Crazy!
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On Tue, 4 Feb 2014 23:34:55 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

+1
When I was in Detroit last month I saw exactly the same stupid behavior that the Northerners are whining at the Southerners about.
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On Tue, 4 Feb 2014 23:34:55 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

lunch" at noon, but the white crap was coming down pretty good - and it was that grainy crap - not nice soft flakes - which made the roads slippery as goose shit. The pick-em-up has snows and posi - but trying to get around the corner from Weber Street to Columbia in Waterloo the truck wanted to go straight ahead whether I had the brakes or the gas on, and regardless which way I had the wheels turned. The snow bank stopped me. Then I had to stop again when there were about a dozen vehicles trying to make it up the grade in 6 inches of snow - I went all the way up the hill crosswise, and decided to just go home (another 2 blocks on the level) instead of another 10 miles of country hills and curves.
Sometimes it's all about knowing when to quit!!!
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wrote:

Hmm. When I lived in Vermont, it was no problem. The roofs stayed cold enough that ice dams weren't a problem. Well, in the houses that weren't built in the '70s or early '80s.
Here in GA it might be more of a concern. Though we only got a couple of inches of snow and it'll probably all be gone Saturday. The issue was the attic getting warmer than freezing while the eves were colder. Any water then gets "dammed" by the ice over the eves. This shouldn't be a problem, in this case, because the roof will be the same temperature, as it warms. Assuming a ventilated attic and insulation, of course.
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On 1/29/2014 1:59 PM, woodchucker wrote:

A good idea. I'm one of the ones in a city ill prepared for two inches of snow.
Here they don't even require tar paper, let alone ice damn membrane. Not sure how well the membrane works, but I had it put in.
I've got a truck across the street that slid backwards and wedged itself in between a phone pole and a cement wall. Almost no damage now, but I imagine that won't be the case when it is pulled out!
Southerners do not understand ice and snow. I hear a car at this very moment gunning the engine trying to move.
Jeff

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On 1/30/2014 7:13 AM, Jeff Thies wrote:

Bullshit! We even have a snowplow:
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/zz81vWs7zJBSOVlPJdMk0NMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink
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On 1/30/2014 8:31 AM, Swingman wrote:

Damn fine machine!
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wrote:

I would not think that a properly vented roof would ice dam.
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On 1/30/2014 10:01 AM, snipped-for-privacy@wind.net wrote:

I know that even a well insulated attic , well ventilated will still damn.
The problem is the sun and air, it will melt the snow, and that will refreeze at night if cold enough (usually is). Then the rethaw will start the process over.... And that is where the problem occurs.
When my house was built, they did not have the glue down membranes in use regularly. Now I believe they do. I am due for a new roof, but it will likely be a second layer.. so not really ideal for a membrane.
--
Jeff

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wrote:

I was referring to how the attic is ventilated above the soffit.
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The problem that bit me several years ago was not caused by the roof. It was caused by the gutters.
When there is snow followed by subfreezing temps, the sun melts the snow, which drains into the gutters, where it freezes immediately.
Usually this isn't too much of a problem. But a few years back, things combined just wrong. We'd had enough of that cycle to completely fill the gutters. Then we got more snow, then the snow melted from all but the eves. Then we got freezing rain. The gutters kept the eves cold enough to freeze the saturated snow, then the rain backed up behind that.
I keep saying that I'll put emergency heating cables in the gutters. Maybe next year.
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On Thu, 30 Jan 2014 11:18:40 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

I had a near miss in Flagstaff, AZ one day when a couple of feet of snow slid off a metal roof just as I stepped out of the way. I had a blessed day!
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*snip*
I thought about putting a couple of them up over a Morton Building door. Shut the door and whoosh! snow all over. I've been wondering if it'd be worth the effort...
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 1/30/2014 4:39 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

out better.
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Jeff

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On 1/30/2014 7:01 AM, snipped-for-privacy@wind.net wrote:

house will melt the ice. No problem. There are some consequences of going through an uninsulated winter, however.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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