flattening Shapton stones - any alternatives to the Shapton plates?

Hello,
I realize the Shapton sharpening stones last/stay flat a gazillion times longer than regular waterstones. So they must be really resistant to wear, right?
I'm wondering if people have successfully used sandpaper on glass, or used something like these ceramic plates: http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/Merchant/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=toolshop&Product_Code=MS-CFP100&Category_Code=THW http://www.garrettwade.com/jump.jsp?lGen tail&itemID3226&itemType=PRODUCT&iMainCat=0&iSubCat=0&iProductID3226 to flatten a shapton stone successfully. I'm sure the two Shapton lapping plates are very good, but they are also expensive. Do methods that flatten softer stones also work on a Shapton stone?
(Aside - my LV 60M60.01 trashes any sandpaper I flatten it on, and the grit removed does nasty things to my plate glass... anyone have good suggestions on how to flatten that brick?)
Thank you!
- Daniel
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I 'm happy with using a course (325 grit) diamond stone for this job.
Jay Knepper

http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/Merchant/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=toolshop&Product_Code=MS-CFP100&Category_Code=THW
http://www.garrettwade.com/jump.jsp?lGen tail&itemID3226&itemType=PRODUCT&iMainCat=0&iSubCat=0&iProductID3226
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I have an old Carborundum SC dual stone I'd like to flatten, won't spend that much for a ceramic plate, I know the stone will ruin any file too.
Alex
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About the cheapest way is to get a piece of glass, tape it to your table saw or other flat surface, apply coarse valve grinding grit (available in any auto parts store) and have at it. Virtually all glass made now is float glass, and is very flat. I know it is none of my business but why not get a new India combination stone; you will find that it cuts better than the carburundum. Additionally, you will have one beater stone for knives and gouges and a flat stone for chisels and plane irons.

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Currently I am a learner, so I am fettling used tools I have bought doing the scary sharp method for sharpening and flattening plane soles. To me SS is awesome because the area on which to work is much larger than on stones, and I'm not carving, no carving tools. Everything I've done has gone over 220 paper, so next is 600 then 1200 for chisels. I think the only way to use stones is buy an old General brand honing guides not made these days, it stays off the stone because it is really large. My guide is that common copy of another famous one, Eclipse, from Rockler but available everywhere and made somewhere in Asia, these are heavy and made well, and work really well!
Alex
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On 1 Oct 2004 09:31:18 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@netscape.net (Daniel) wrote:

the problem is they wear everything else out pretty fast. When I first got them I used drywall screen. I would get maybe at most two flattening out of a sheet. if you can get a flat metal plate you can then just use the grit to do it. that would be a cheap way.
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Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
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Would a DMT monocrystalline stone (10in duosharp coarse?) last long flattening a Shapton stone? (I realize the DRLP is itself a diamond-bonded stone, but there still may be something special that Shapton does to make it suitable for its stones.)
Thanks for your comments, Steve.
Steve Knight wrote:

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I used one for a bit. though I used the extra course stone. but it was slower then the lapping plate. but it worked fine with no problems.
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