First time veneer

I want to try and lay down some veneer on a box project. Having never worked with veneer other than some antique refinishing work about a hundred years ago what do I need to know?
The box itself will be made out of baltic ply, it's used for holding slot cars. About 20" long, 12"deep, and 14" high. It's got two doors on the front that swing open horizontally.
I'd like to use spalted maple, I'll need to finish the veneer with something fairly durable, any thoughts, ideas, warnings, etc. very welcome.
Thanks.
John Emmons
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I would advise you to wear some sort of respirator when sanding your spalted maple. Spalted wood is commonly used to describe wood with zone lined decay. When sanding any type of material I highly suggest that some sort of respirator be worn. In this case, I would highly recommend it. I would recommend "Tried and True, Original Wood Finish formula". It leaves a very nice finish and can be buffed or rubbed.
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Thanks, I've read that about spalted wood.
John

spalted
of
very
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My only veneering experience has been with a home-made vacuum press. It's made with a thick vinyl bag and a low tech pump I got off of Ebay, and some incidental parts and ideas I got from Joewoodworker.com about $80 all told.
http://www.joewoodworker.com/veneering/welcome.htm
I have used it to veneer (both sides) of MDF panels that I then used for an edge-banded table top. I will be doing more.
Fine Woodworking online had a nice article and video of veneering techniques a couple of months ago, but I see it is no longer on line. This person used a veneering press (about 30 hydraulic jacks in a big steel frame, weighing about 1200 pounds. At the end, he said, "or you could use a vacuum press" (saves me buying a regular veneer press!). He did have some nice techniques for using a slightly bowed board as a paul to clamp the veneer to the sides of the board.
I used yellow glue, though I am sure purists will prefer hot hide glue for all sorts of satisfying reasons. The veneering hammer will also help build your upper body strength.
good luck!
merle
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On Thu, 02 Dec 2004 18:28:05 GMT, "John Emmons"
Tage Frid, 2nd volume of the first book. Good section on veneering.
IMHO, you should use hot hide glue, just because it works best. Work in a warm room, or at least have the timber warm beforehand, and you get a nice rapid tack on first application, but not so much that you can't work with it.
Tools are a veneer hammer and a veneer saw. You need both, but can make the first. It should have a thick metal edge with a good smooth radius on it. Don't use guitar fret - it's too light and gets hot too easily - use some heavy brass.
A veneer saw is a revelation if you've been managing without. It's a short bellied saw, but it's filed to a knife edge as well. You can easily work single-piece veneer without one, but it will improve the accuracy of your bookmatching.
To work quickly, use the veneer saw a lot on still-hot veneer. To work easily, let it cool down and adhere properly before you trim it and veneer the adjacent surface. Good temperature control on your gluepot gives you longer working times - start early in the morning and you'll get 8 hours out of one pot of glue, but don't leave it overnight and expect to veneer with it afterwards.

Baltic birch ply is one of the best veneer substrates around. It just sits there, no problems at all. As it happens I'm doing a similar box myself, as a wall-hanging tool cabinet. Cherry veneer over birch ply.

Veneer is just timber - finish it how you like.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Thanks Andy.
John Emmons
wrote:

front
something
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