European Oak Veneer

Howdy, I have an old table from 1930 - 1940 (Yeah I'm a young punk, thats old to me.) The table has a removable leaf that has spent years flipped down underneath the table. It became bowed and the veneer cracked and fell away in places. I tried to salvage what I could but no luck. The veneer on the rest of the table is fine.
It is made out of poplar and topped off with a veneeer that looks to be European Oak. I call it European Oak because I purchased the 50pc wood identification kit from woodcraft and the veneer they called European Oak was a spot on match.
What I'd like to do is purchase some veneer and replace the veneer on the leaves. This is where I ran into my problem. The European Oak veneer that is so proudly listed in the identikit, is darned hard to find.
Does anyone know where I can purchase this veneer? I've been looking all over the web and I find very little. Lots of oak, and bog oak and more oaks than I knew existed, but no European oak.
If anyone could help me out I'd appreciate it greatly.
Thanks, John
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wrote:

No problem round here, but then I'm in Europe. 8-) http://www.robbins.co.uk/Pdf%20Files/pl8_veneers.pdf
"European" oak is Quercus robur or Q. petrea. It's a white oak, like the American white oak Q. alba. It's a bit harder to work and not so pale, but the figure is very similar and you'd be hard put to tell the difference. Just avoid the red oaks and you'll be OK.
Oak is often dearkened during finishing, sometimes by ammonia fuming, sometimes by dyes. You will have to do some colour matching.
Oak also has pores, which are often filled during finishing. You might want to match their treatment too.
-- Do whales have krillfiles ?
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Try here: http://www.forloversofwood.com /. A & M Specialty Woods, they have English Oak in the vast selection.
HTH, Jeffo

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brought forth from the murky depths:

Are you refinishing the whole table?

Even if you find the right species, whatever you buy will never exactly match that table, John. It was probably done in one shot with the leaves in so everything matched. All from one flitch of veneer from a single tree.

Why not take this as a challenge and use a different wood, something subtly contrasting? Add some unique inlay/marquetry to make it even more special.
- If the gods had meant us to vote, they'd have given us candidates. -------------- http://diversify.com Website Application Programming
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Howdy, If this has already hit the newsgroup I apoligize for the double posting. My ISP has had a few problems and when I checked I didn't see my post, so I'm trying again.
I have an old table from 1930 - 1940 (Yeah I'm a young punk, thats old to me.) The table has a removable leaf that has spent years flipped down underneath the table. It became bowed and the veneer cracked and fell away in places. I tried to salvage what I could but no luck. The veneer on the rest of the table is fine.
It is made out of poplar and topped off with a veneeer that looks to be European Oak. I call it European Oak because I purchased the 50pc wood identification kit from woodcraft and the veneer they called European Oak was a spot on match.
What I'd like to do is purchase some veneer and replace the veneer on the leaves. This is where I ran into my problem. The European Oak veneer that is so proudly listed in the identikit, is darned hard to find.
Does anyone know where I can purchase this veneer? I've been looking all over the web and I find very little. Lots of oak, and bog oak and more oaks than I knew existed, but no European oak.
If anyone could help me out I'd appreciate it greatly.
Thanks, John
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