End Table Tile Top Encapsulation

I am working on replacing an end table top with a new top that has tiles inset into it with a wood border. I have seen on shows where after the tile is set and grouted they pour a clear liquid over the tiles that levels and hardens. I would like to find out what this liquid was or what I can use. I plan on using minwax spar urethane to finish the wood border and base before I place the tiles. I would then like to grout and then after pour this liquid level with the wood border top to make a clear glass like surface showing the encapsulated tiles. Or should I skip the liquid? Any thoughts greatly appreciated. Thank you for your help.
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I am working on replacing an end table top with a new top that has tiles inset into it with a wood border. I have seen on shows where after the tile is set and grouted they pour a clear liquid over the tiles that levels and hardens. I would like to find out what this liquid was or what I can use. I plan on using minwax spar urethane to finish the wood border and base before I place the tiles. I would then like to grout and then after pour this liquid level with the wood border top to make a clear glass like surface showing the encapsulated tiles. Or should I skip the liquid? Any thoughts greatly appreciated.
Thank you for your help.
PS if this posted twice, sorry, I had a browser error after I tried posting the 1st time.
Thanks
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ddecoste wrote:

to
then
encapsulated
appreciated.
I set tile for a living, some time ago. Here are some thoughts:
Good idea, finishing the wood before grouting the tile. Grout is extremely abrasive, it's a good idea to mask off your wood as well. It's easy to cut through the wood finish and permanently stain the wood (DAMHIKT)
Use the correct grout for the size of your joints, unsanded for under 1/8, sanded for over. Otherwise, your grout WILL crack or look ragged.
Stable, rigid base is important, use cement board under the tile if possible.
Let your tile cement cure overnight before grouting, and your grout cure several days before sealing or coating
There are several sealing products on the market, mainly intended to seal porous tile like mexican clay and to seal the grout against stains. I reccomend these as a must on a surface that will get spills, etc. I have not used any other coating over tile, since tile is impervious to liquids if glazed, and holds up for centuries, I don't see the point. I'd be leary of using plastic (It's probably bar top resin you saw being used) to "level" a table top, mainly because it's not UV stable (yellows over years) and the expansion rate of tile and wood are significantly different and would probably cause cracking of the plastic. Once you pour, there's no going back and refinishing either...
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ddecoste wrote:

It sounds to me that you're looking for a product like KraftKote. See:
http://www.klockit.com/products/dept-94__sku-GGGEE.html
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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On Mon, 6 Dec 2004 08:24:46 -0700, ddecoste wrote

Eschew the grout unless it is thin (joints under 1/8") Use "grout caulk" which is basically silicon with a colorant and sand added to look like grout and still flex enough to prevent cracking. Commonly used where tiles on adjoining surfaces meet up or as an expansion joint on large surfaces. If your tile substrate is cement based backer board "hardi-panel" or such (1/4" thick and up) you'll only need to use the caulk on the perimeter. The tile may be covered with most any tile sealer. Penetrating sealers soak in and leave the surface texture. Plain sealers usually leave behind a thin film. Bartop epoxy will leave a thick, clear surface.
-Bruce
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