Easiest way to make Frame & Panel doors

Which method of making Frame and Panel "Shaker" style doors is more error free and easier for a semi-newbie? (Router or table saw)
The cabinet doors will have a veneer panel. The stiles and rails can be cut with either a (a) tongue and groove router bit set or (b) be done on the table saw with use of a tenoning jig and dado.
About 20-25 doors to make.
I ask as I am choosing which equiptment to buy...(already have a good table saw, but may need to replace my Craftsman crap router). Both options seem to be about the same price...
Thanks,
Ted
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Hi Ted, I just used (b) on a couple of "Shaker" doors. Actually I did not use a tenoning jig. If I were to do more than a few, a jig would be a good idea. Doing 25 doors will dull many brands of router bits giving you a lot of chip out. My 2 cents, JG
Rik Powe wrote:

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Ted, it may depend on what type of stock you are useing. Oak and maple are real hard on bits unless you can afford some real nice ones. (Which I cannot) I just build some pine cabinets and used a router with no problem. If I had made hardwwod doors, I would have used a jig, and had an excuse to have my dedicated hardwood sawblade sharpened. My 2 cents as well. Dave
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Rik Powe wrote:

I just got finished making 7 cherry doors for kitchen cabs I am building. My stock is 3/4". I used a 1/4" slot cutting bit in a router table for the rails and stiles. Set in the middle for the stiles and run through on both sides to center. And then set low for the rails. I used a sled to guide the rails and made sure that I had backers for all operations. I did not have chip out problems.
The convenience for this is that once the fence is set correctly, you know that you will get exactly the same depth of cut for all operations. Just be careful when cutting for the stiles. Be sure to use test pieces and sneak up on the right height adjustment or the fit will be too loose. Also make sure that your stock is uniform thickness.
I probably would have experimented with the table saw, but I don't have a blade with flat top teeth and already had a slot cutting bit for the router. I found the router to be easy and accurate using featherboards when slotting the stiles and a sled to cut the rails.
~ Wyatt
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Ted, it may depend on what type of stock you are useing. Oak and maple are real hard on bits unless you can afford some real nice ones. (Which I cannot) I just build some pine cabinets and used a router with no problem. If I had made hardwwod doors, I would have used a jig, and had an excuse to have my dedicated hardwood sawblade sharpened. My 2 cents as well. Dave
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thick center bead board panel.
I make 1/2" deep groove on the rails and styles to fit the panel, on the TS. Then I cut the tenons with the router table to fit those groves.
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