Dynabrade Problem (wont run)

Greetings,
My Dynabrade 5" sander (57015)is about a year old and has had very little use, maybe about 10 hours or so. Lately sometimes it won't go until I manually wobble the disc to turn the rotor a little. The shop where I work uses Dynabrades exclusively several hours a day and has never had this problem. My compressor has adequate pressure and volumn. This is a rebuilt unit from JKStorm on e-bay. Have I got a lemon? Any suggestions? Should this unit be oiled?
Thanks, Charlie in Kentucky
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Charlie
I have two Dynabrade 5" sanders which I have used almost daily for the last 5 years. I oil them once a week. No problems.
Tom Plamann
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I have lots of air tools and whenever they fail to spin, it's due to lack of oiling. Get an inline oiler or remember to oil them more often. oil for air tools is designed to reduce rust from the moisture in the air lines. Even HD has the correct oil in stock in their tool depts.
dave
Charlie Campney wrote:

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Some of these sanders are oilless, some aren't. I'd ask Dynabrade. Does it sit there passing a lot of air before it gets going? Either needs oilling or need rebuilding.
GTO(John)

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I have a 5" Dynabrade. Absolutely love it. No more slow electric sanders for me. As for your question, yes, the Dynabrade should be oiled, in fact, in should be oiled a lot. Should have an in-line oiler attached to the hose. If you've been running w/o oil, you may just need a good oiling and run through, but be prepared for a rebuild kit. Good news though, I understand the rebuild kits are cheap.
-Rick Buchanan
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On 12 Feb 2004 05:44:54 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@logantele.com (Charlie Campney) wrote:

I don't know about your Dynabrade DA sander in particular, but almost ALL pneumatic rotary tools need a bit of lubrication. Typically, one has a bottle of 'air tool oil' and justs adds a drop or two through the hook-up/quick disconnect port after use. Larger shops typically have an in-line dryer/regulator/oiler setup. However, if you ever want to shoot paint, avoid the in-line oiler. Keeping the air 'dry' also helps the life of the tool, and IS mandatory for proper paint spraying success.
DLGlos
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From the Dynabrade web site,
3. All Dynabrade air motors should be lubricated. Dynabrade recommends one drop of air lube per minute for each 10 SCFM (example: if the tool
specification states 40 SCFM, set the drip rate of your filter-lubricator at 4 drops per minute).
Dynabrade Air Lube (P/N 95842: 1pt. 473ml.) is recommended.
4. An Air Line Filter-Regulator-Lubricator must be used with this air tool to maintain all warranties. Dynabrade recommends the following: 11405 Air Line
Filter-Regulator-Lubricator - Provides accurate air pressure regulation, two-stage filtration of water contaminants and micro-mist lubrication of pneumatic
components. Operates 40 SCFM @ 100 PSIG has 3/8" NPT female ports.
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<snip> My Dynabrade 5" sander <snip>Lately sometimes it won't go

More than likely yes it should be oiled. Double check though in case it uses teflon seals, then it definitely should not be oiled. But more than likely it just regular o-rings, and the more oil the better. It is very important to have dry air going through the tool. Water in the lines will shorten drastically shorten the times between maintenance.
Your specific problem sounds like their is a problem with the rotary vane within the sander. If no air is leaking then the rings are fine and if it spins ok then the bearings are fine. If it has a hard time starting and stalls easily then the vane is sticking.
This is a very easy fix. Though it can be very difficult to get to the rotary vane. If you can take apart the sander you will see that their is a rotating cylinder with a slot in it. Within the slot is the vane, usually made out of micarta or something like that. This whole assembly spins within an elliptical opening. You will find this arrangement in most rotating pneumatic tools as well as within vacuum pumps.
The fix is simple, clean up the goop, and then sand the vane and the slot it slides in with fine sandpaper until it slides in and out freely. Put everything back together and then oil well and voila a brand new tool. I take apart almost every pneumatic tool that I buy used and do this maintenance. The increased performance can sometimes be extraordinary.
Aloha, Russell
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