Drywall on the Table Saw

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wrote:
|> So thanks everyone, for allowing me to avoid the School of Hard Knocks. | |Another reason, the drywall dust will stick to the "pork chop" sawdust on |the trunnion/motor that got there when you sliced up that whole pork loin |last week. Should have used the mitersaw for that.
Come on, everybody knows you use the bandsaw for that.
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Rudy wrote:

I thought everybody knew you use a radial arm saw for pork?
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Nova wrote:

My Dad always cut frozen sausage on the band saw.
UA100
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On Mon, 31 May 2004 21:55:06 -0400, "RickS" <rick --dot-- s --at-- comcast.net> wrote:><snip unanimous replies, confirming the stupidest idea ever>

CUTTING it wouldn't be the bad idea, IMHO. You could use a good planeing blade...and I don't think the dust would be unbearable...although I'd definitely wear a dust mask (most folks should anyway...but don't).
But the HANDLING would be the bad idea. Yer always starting with 4x8...which crack easily if you don't have the proper support. But the time you set up all the equipment, you can just as easily knife it on the floor...or cut it with a sabre saw on some horses.
I think you'd have more chance of damaging the cuts with a table saw...than cutting it or sabreing it.
Have a nice week...
Trent
Dyslexics of the world ... UNTIE !
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"RickS" <rick --dot-- s --at-- comcast.net> wrote in message

large
I don't think using a table saw would be wise, but did discover recently that a cheap jig saw is handy for cutting out holes for electrical outlets and for irregular edges.
Gary
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Spiral saw is best.
Have a nice week...
Trent
Dyslexics of the world ... UNTIE !
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RickS writes:

I don't understand why you would want to. A utility knife with a straightedge for a guide does a fast, neat job with almost no effort. Score and snap. No dust.
Running it through a table saw means horsing the sheet onto the saw and guiding it, while with the utility knife, you get it on your sawhorse/2x4 stand and move the knife. Much easier. No dust to get into the tablesaw and ruin it.
Charlie Self "The test and the use of man's education is that he finds pleasure in the exercise of his mind." Jacques Barzun
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Charlie Self wrote:

Most any basic cut can be made with the sheetrock leaning against the wall, although some intricate or precise cuts might benefit from setting the rock up on a stand. That type of fine tuning is usually done on the wall, though. Same with cutouts for boxes. On another note, some amateurs try to save L-shaped pieces of rock, which is almost always a waste, the savings in time by making full-width cuts offsets the slight increase in material used.
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On 01 Jun 2004 02:57:22 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

Everybody says this...but I don't think there's any more risk than with saw dust.
Have a nice week...
Trent
Dyslexics of the world ... UNTIE !
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Those small Stanley Surform (or generic, cabbage shredder type) planes are good for beveling drywall edges, as long as you don't have to do it to 100 sheets.
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RickS <rick --dot-- s --at-- comcast.net> wrote:

Sounds reasonable to me. Just lower the TS blade all the way, remove the fence, guard & splitter, lay the drywall down on the tablesaw, and cut it with a utility knife like everyone else does.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Mon, 31 May 2004 17:31:13 -0400, "RickS" <rick --dot-- s --at-- comcast.net> wrote:>Would anyone consider cutting drywall/sheetrock on their table saw?

Maybe not the stupidest...but pretty darn close! lol
Have a nice week...
Trent
Dyslexics of the world ... UNTIE !
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On Mon, 31 May 2004 17:31:13 -0400, "RickS" <rick --dot-- s --at-- comcast.net> wrote:>Would anyone consider cutting drywall/sheetrock on their table saw?

YES!!
Try using your circular saw on it and report to the group how that goes!!!

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    Greetings and Salutations...
On Wed, 02 Jun 2004 09:15:35 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@NOSPAMhotmail.com wrote:

    It is a bad idea. Once, quite some years ago, I cut some blueboard on the tablesaw for a friend. She had this idea that it would make a good board for pins, etc. It worked ok, as she got it set up, but, luckily, it was an old, crappy carbide blade I put on the saw, because it DID chip several teeth.     Cut really nice, though.     If I were to do it again, I would do it the smart (usual) way -Score with a knife, break, and smooth with a surform plane.     Even the concrete-based blueboard produced a lot of nasty, abrasive, irritating dust.     Regards     Dave Mundt
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On Wed, 02 Jun 2004 17:03:36 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@esper.com (Dave Mundt) wrote:

Why are people even discussing this? You are not a serious woodworker if you'd abuse your tools this way. Also, you aren't a plasterer. The plasterer is the one who covers over a multitude of errors. You simply don't have to cut drywall to fit. Smooth with a plane ????? You score, break, then cut the paper with the same blade. Period.
I imagine the next question will be should I stop the saw before I change the blade.
Bill.
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This is a good way to destroy a table saw. Why not use a utility knife and a straight edge?
RB
RickS wrote:

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I've used a jig saw a number of times for outlets or for tricky cuts, and almost always been happy. At my wife's behest (to shut her up) I used a Dremel last time I drywalled (the only tool she brought to the marriage, so naturally the tool she thinks is best for every freaking job) and it did seem to be the best tool for the job. That is, if the job that you're doing involves carefully placing the Dremel spiral cutting blade in the hole then randomly cutting nonlinear slices in wholly arbitrary spots on the drywall.

large
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