Do you round off tenons to fit routered mortises or chop the corners off?

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On Fri, 16 Jan 2004 11:40:23 -0500, "Mitch Berkson"

That 1/16" is for glue squeezeout, not movement. Glued joints don't move too awfully much.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

You wouldn't think. But at 1:17 in the video, he says that the 1/16" is to allow for wood movement.
Mitch Berkson
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brought forth from the murky depths:

-------------- Actually that reference is regarding the width of the tenon, not the length.
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On Fri, 16 Jan 2004 21:57:26 -0500, "Mitch Berkson"

I meant tenon length/mortise depth difference but I see i nthe video he's referring to tenon width. I still disagree, though I'm sure I've made fewer M&T joints than Lon has.

What did you expect from a Californian? They have all sorts of movements out there. <giggle>
Nah, I don't buy it. You've chipped dried squeezeout off a joint before, right? It's far too solid to allow movement of that magnitude. When glue joints are tested, the _wood_ fails before the joint does in most cases.
Ian Kirby disagrees. http://www.woodworkersjournal.com/articles/mortiseandtenon.cfm
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I haven't made any yet myself, but when David marks makes his loose tenons he uses a roundover bit that is 1/2 the the thickness of the mortice. So for your 3/8" mortice, you would use a 3/16" radius roundover to make the tenons. That particular bit isn't very pricey and you'll have it for a long time. Bill
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thanks, Bill. George also mentioned that. I was so "sure" that I'd need to use a 3/8" round over to make the profile for the loose tenon to fit a 3/8" mortise! I expected to align it carefully with the work piece, make a cut, and then turn it over and rout the other side. What I got for my effort was a torpedo shaped profile.
I looked in the router bit catalogs and figured that the bullnose bit (once again as George pointed out) would work, but geez, at almost $50 a copy I need a cheaper alternative. Little roundovers would be about a fifth that price.
dave
Bill Hodgson wrote:

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Ah, but you can get "bead" profiles that double as bullnose.
Note that if you are using loose tenons of good hardwood, you only need one size, ever. 3/8 of hardwood won't ever shear, and will glue in anywhere.

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On Fri, 16 Jan 2004 11:17:33 -0500, "George"
|Ah, but you can get "bead" profiles that double as bullnose. | |Note that if you are using loose tenons of good hardwood, you only need one |size, ever. 3/8 of hardwood won't ever shear, and will glue in anywhere.
'Cept you really have to hammer on them to get them into a 1/4" mortise [g].
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thanks, George.
dave
George wrote:

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Bevelling the corners is fine. Don't need to round 'em.

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