Delta QT-10 vs. Ryobi BT3100

I am purchasing a table saw for personal use - I have no (immediate) aspirations to become a cabinet maker. I will be using it first of to help build a deck, some fences and the odd table, bench or whatever after that. I have two available that fit my budget: The Delta QT-10 and Ryobi BT3100 - anyone have any experience with these?
The Roybi has more bells and whistles, and the Delta feels like an 'old school' dependable saw. Anyone have any recommendations on one over the other? Some questions I am wondering about are:
-induction vs. belt driven: Is there a noticeable difference in feel between the Delta's 10amp induction and the Ryobi's 15amp belt. Being a novice I'm more concerned with safety - would one be safer?
-Cast Iron vs. sliding miter table thingy: The Sliding miter table looks neat - but will it be practical? Is the Cast Iron better than the Ryobi's plastic table top?
-Is the Ryobi's router table attachment any good? I have a Porter Cable 693LR/PK - any headaches getting this router combo to work with it?
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Had one of those BT3000's a number of years ago with the sliding miter table. Nice feature. But it wouldn't stay aligned with the blade (the sliding fence was troublesome too) and as such was more trouble than it was worth. The biggest drawback was that model didn't have a miter gauge slot. That may not seem like a big deal, until you look into making some jigs.
The router table attachment was pretty decent. (Though, it was just a hole in the top that was tapped for the Ryobi router and I'm guessing those holes wouldn't have lined up with the PC base) I seem to recall though that it did not have a removable insert and it wouldn't accept larger panel-raising bits.
Overall, the Ryobi, with all of the bells and whistles, was really less capable than most of the less expensive benchtop saws.
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I bought the BT3000, predecessor to the BT3100, about the time of introduction. I'd miss the sliding miter but have no experience with what some would call a "real TS". I've never considered using the router slab that came with the saw, have built shop built tables instead.
On 22 Feb 2005 10:31:52 -0800, " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

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Bought the BT3100 2 years ago and love it. Great saw for the shop. John
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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For decking, unless it is a *very*small* deck, a good quality hand-held circular saw -- generically a "SkilSaw", regardless of who actually made it -- is a more appropriate tool.

The BT3100 is capable of *excellent* work -- it's a h*ll of a good saw for the money. The only downside is that you _do_ have to treat it with reasonable "care and affection" for it to last. It _is_ marketed as a "precision woodworking" tool, not something you can beat up on and abuse day after day.
To find something 'significantly better' than the 3100, you probably have to look at spending _at_least_ twice the money.
As for belt-drive, vs. direct-drive -- belt drive is almost always better. Tends to be smoother running, and is *MUCH* less expensive repair when something in the 'drive train' has problems.
If your 'down the road' work -- "... the odd table, bench", etc. is going to be mostly "rough" work -- e.g. stuff for the shop/garage/etc. not anything you would want to proudly display in the living room or bedroom, etc., the aforementioned hand-held circular saw -- along with a couple of 'guides' for making straight rips and cross-cuts -- is likely to be the best fit, and the most economical solution to your needs.
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As he said, for a deck or fence, the table saw is pretty much useless (Ok, limited use, unless you need to justify the purchase to SWMBO somehow. We'll back you up in that case). A mitre saw or good circular saw will be much more productive.
Clint
wrote:

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I have the Ryobi BT300SX
The projects here were made with that saw.
http://woodwork.pmccl.com /
It's definitely not like my dad's old cast iron table saw with the induction motor. I get pissed if I can see 1/64 to 1/128 error. in a miter cut. You need that precision for fine work. The old cast iron table saw didn't do work quite that fine. So it's not the material of the saw -- it is the quality of the manufacturing and the accuracy and precision of the mechanics.
Regardless of which saw you get - get the angle gauges (to set up the tilt and miter gauges) from Lee Valley if you do fine work - and an accurate engineers square to check the squareness of the work.
I have used the router table for a Black and Decker 3/4 horse. (Single speed - too fast) and a King Variable speed 3 1/4 horse. It works OK - I will be adding a router bench -- perhaps on the ceiling -- since there is room there.
If you have a drill press it is easy to change or make a plate.
Check here for lots of info. http://bt3central.com / http://www.ryobitools.com/cgi-bin/dcforum/dcboard.cgi?az=list&forum ForumID24&confConfID1
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Will
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Much appreciated! Ryobi it is. Thanks for all the help.
BTW, I will be using mainly my circular saw & miter saw for the deck - I want to get this purchase in before I go broke from buying all the wood. :D
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