Delta 6" jointer

I bought a used 6" delta jointer but it is not the one shown on the delta website. Was there an older 6" model which is now discontinued? It has a stand and cast iron table and the previous owner says he bought it a couple of years ago. The blades are level with the outfeed table but I find anything I put through it does not touch the blades for the last 1/4. The first 3/4 of the stock get jointed but then the cutters do not touch the work for the rest of the pass. What is going on here? Thanks
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all the way if they were. Basically, you know they are adjusted properly when the jointer works correctly.
Anyhow, does it have wheels or levers to adjust with?
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The previous owner had all manuals etc.. and I found out it is the 27-380C I checked the blades with a straight edge in relation to the outfeed table and they seem fine. I will check the 2 tables to see if they line up. Also the test piece was a 1' piece of 2X6 lumber.

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I laid a straightedge over the entire bed and the beginning of the infeed table slopes down almost 1/8". It doesn't look like the infeed table is adjustable, it pivots on pins through a hinging mechanism. The outfeed table looks as though it is on a bolts on to rubber pad. I assume the end of this has to be raised in order to be parallel to the infeed table.

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habbi wrote:

Best bet is to go to the Delta web site, get the 800 number and call tech support if the manual doesn't describe how to re-align the tables.
Sounds like the unit may have been dropped or otherwise abused sometime...
Delta is quite good at getting you to knowledgeable people to help if the question/problem is out of the ordinary.
Unfortunately, it's possible the previous owner knew of a problem and took advantage... :(
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It's possible that the outfeed table is adjustable to be parallel with the infeed. Usually (with any decent jointer-- this is even true with my old rockwell (which became the delta 4") the infeed table moves up & down to change the depth of cut. the outfeed table is only adjustable for angle to the infeed. There should be knobs & locking nuts or gibs on each table. The infeed has to be raised to the level of the cut, then the adjustment can be made on the outfeed. Use a long straight edge to confirm parallel, then lower the infeed for a test cut, and readjust, retest as needed.
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1/4 and 3/4 of what length?
Is the outfeed table flat? Is there a sag at the end that would lift the stock off the blades?
djb
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wrote:

Yes. When Delta decided to get into the lower priced 6" market (and ultimately abandoning the premium DJ15--which was also when they were abandoning all of their descriptive nomenclature; Delta Jointer 15cm which is 6"; DJ20, 8" jointer; DL40--Delta Lathe 40 cm which is 16", ) they introduced a model which, if memory serves was the 37-18-something. There was a lot of brouhaha on the forums about it's fence and Delta ultimately replaced it; possibly with the 37-190. I don't remember when or why the '195 came along. I've had a DJ15 all that time so I really didn't pay that much attention.
There must be a model number on it somewhere. With that you can check with Delta.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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wrote:

You might check the tables to be sure they are in line with each other. Turn the spindle so your blades don't contact a long straight edge placed across both tables. Raise the in feed table to the same height as the out feed table and see if the straight edge will lay flat across and along both tables. If it does not you can remove the tables and clean any debris from the surfaces where there is contact. This should get the tables back in a straight line.
Mike O.
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If "everything" is just a couple of test boards, it may just be you. Before you tear into the machine, take a look at the side of the board opposite where you took the bad cut and see if it's high on the ends and low in the middle. What you describe also happens when you try to join the other side (bowed) of such a board by maintaining contact nose to tail. What you need to do is join the middle until it's approximately even with each end before trying the full length.
After that, the edge and gibs.
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