dado blades (beginner)

A while back I had bought a dado set from Sears. Having just used them for the first time, I see the chippers in the center are not at the same height as the main blades.
_____ | ---- -- -- | ------------- ^ ^ main ^^^^ chippers
Is this a normal condition, or just the lower quality set? The difference is not much. I'd say 1/32 - 1/64, but when you butt up another piece it does leave those little gaps.
For not it's ok, since I'm building some cabinets for the garage, but I don't wan to build anything nicer with this set. It'll take a bit of work filing/sanding that down.
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Take it back and try another one. If the new one is the same way go to another manufacturer. The blades and chippers should be the same diameter, creating a flat bottomed dado. I bought a CMT set sometime back and one of the chippers was off about 1/8 inch. I carried it back to the supplier and he ground it down, but only because he also ran a machine shop. Si
Pete Martin wrote:

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I bought a Freud set a few years ago. The bottoms of the dados aren't as smooth as the ones done with the router but not as irregular as what you describe. I think you can do better.
Bob g.
S. A. King wrote:

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With a good dado, you may see the lines in the kerf, but the fit should be perfect. Flat bottoms are the bragging points for brands like Ridge Carbide and Forrest.
As a beginner, many of us bought lower priced tools to try them out or get a fee for what they do. Later we learn to buy the better quality the first time.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

As in, "Are all the blates in a dado set equal in size?" if that is what you meant.
Josie
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Thank you all! Yes I've seen the adage about buying the good stuff! I'm a believer now!! Now, if this week's lotto ticket comes thru ....
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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I have done a fair number of dados but have always done them with my router. It seems to me to be easier then to try and get my table saw to do them, so I have never bothered to buy a dado blade. It seems easier to me to clamp a straightedge on a piece of lumber (or whatever) and run a router through it then trying to get a big chunk of lumber to run through a table saw just so.

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I used a router until I got a dado blade. I've not made a dado with the router since as I find the tablesaw much easier and more accurate. Of course Howard Johnson takes the trouble to make 28 flavors and I still eat vanilla. Different strokes, etc.
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Have to agree with you on that. These however were stiles and rails, so not too bad size wise. I've an old router and have had problems with the bit loosening and rising (table mounted) up out of it, so naturally hesitant to use it. ( I've since been able to tighten it down enough. ) Plus the 3/4 in size I didn't have handy; instead of buying a 3/4in bit I bought some lotto tickets so I can buy the good stuff later :)
Bob Peterson wrote:

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