Cutting perfect 5 1/2" circles

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Father Haskell wrote:

Didn't find those markings on my Stanley 25 footer.

It got sided, that day. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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I was in Lowes recently and took a look at hole saws even though I went with the approach mentioned at this website. Those hole saws are VERY expensive.

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On Fri, 05 Dec 2008 01:50:53 GMT, "Dick Snyder"

...yeah, they can get a little pricey. I'm constantly buying tools and such for my biz, which is *me*, so hardly ever think about that aspect, I just write it off and have another tool...been in the biz long enough to have worn through a third generation of some things. That said, I've *always* valued my personal time highly...if it can be done with a machine, or in a more timely manner via a combination of machine(s) and good technique...well, I'm on it! This is not intended to cheapen the "zen" involved with our passion...don't get me wrong, if I could afford to sit on a hilltop crosslegged, sharpening chisels with a waterstone, I'd consider the religious aspect of such a meditation...but, for now anyway, it's a stationary belt sander, glass and sandpaper...and if I'm anywhere near a client who owns a machine shop I get *him* to do it! FWIW, now that we've gone this far on this thread, I don't know that I *would* use my holesaw...might be a little sloppy... ;O)
cg
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wrote:

Exactly, until all the kids in the neighborhood want a truck..lol
Tools, jigs, costs, time, etc. all have to be factored in when you're only doing 4 wheels..
I'll admit it... I did a couple of small wood "train sets" a few years ago, and after reviewing my options, I bought the wheels from Lee Valley..
mac
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"Hoosierpopi" bragged

You must have one of those aircraft carrier router tables.
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wrote:

REAL men use their teeth and intimidate the wood into being round..
mac
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OK, I tried it out. Make a crosscut sled for your table saw, if you don't already have one. Cut your stock to size, and drill axle holes in the center. Make sure you have some bolts the same exact diameter as the holes.
Take a piece of 3/8 plywood, and countersink a bolt through it, so that you can bold the wheel to the plywood, and wtill have it turn freely. (I did this to avoid drilling holes in the sled.)
Cut the plywood so that the countersunk bolt is exactly 5.5 inches from the blade. use a clamp to hold the position of the plywood, for the next wheel.
First, used the sled to take off the corners of the wheel. As it rounds out, start spinning the wheel. Hold the wheel securely, and don't try to take off too mych at once (move the sled so that a little of the wheel is done at one time.
I did it for a round clock, it worked like a charm. Of course, ruined the piece trying to use a roundover bit on the front. I may try to use the table saw for that as well!
good luck
shelly
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On Dec 3, 10:19pm, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:
" I need to cut four 5 1/2" wheels out of 3/4" oak"

"Cut the plywood so that the countersunk bolt is exactly 5.5 inches from the blade." > shelly
Shelly, Shell, Shelly,
2.75" from the blade! And, watch your fingers!
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point take (I'm an idiot sometimes)
I stood on the side of the saw, kept one hand on the bolt, and turned from the other side. I've learned respect for a TS the hard way.
shelly
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I'd use a disk sander jig. Many designs available in magazines. Rough out the circle and sand to size. Too easy for it to get away from you with a router. Bob
wrote:

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"Bob Meyer" wrote:

You could always fly cut 5-9\16", the stack and clamp 4 blanks on a 1/4" bolt which then gets chucked in a drill press.
Clean up a set of 4 to insure uniformity using a right angle jig and sand paper.
Lew
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The word perfect is not to be used in wood or metal. Nothing can be perfect.
Close. Nice. Cut oversize and then mount on a metal rod. Spin rod and sand all at the same time while keeping the centerline parallel to the surface of the sander.
Martin
Dick Snyder wrote:

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Dick
You have received many good ideas. All I can offer is to cut the wheels out on my lathe. All of them at once - for a perfect match. How may wheels do you need/want?
Bob AZ
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Thanks for the offer Bob but I am done with the 4 wheels. I *did* receive a bunch of good ideas. I went with the tablesaw jig which worked out fine but required a lot of passes per wheel. If I have to do this again I will choose another of the ideas suggested here.
Ti
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