crosscut dado a dowel w/ TS, safely

With my TS, I need to make some crosscut 1" wide dados in a 1" diam dowel, about 6" long. The dados will be about 3/8" deep. I have a Freud stacked blade dado set. I am concerned that once the teeth engage the dowel, the dowel will start spinning. At least it will tend to spin. Even with some small rubber-footed clamps I am not sure it will hold. To anyone who has done this, is the torque a substantial concern? Any suggestions as to how to do this safely? TIA. -- Igor
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Make a small v-block and clamp the v-block and dowel to the fence. But I have held 1" rod by hand and not had any problems. Although it wasn't a dado cut.... Do you have a crosscut sled you can use? If so, make something suitable to hold it.
igor wrote:

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Although I haven't had need to do this, I have read somewhere about this method:
Using a sacrificial 2x4, rip a 45 degree groove down the middle - use 2 cuts and make it large enough so that the dowel is nested in it about 1/2 its depth (or more).
Fasten the dowel from the back of the 2x4 with a few drywall screws (shallow enough to avoid the dado of course.)
Run the dados.
Seems like it should work safely.
Lou

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Sorry! For some reason, I read "TS" but was thinking "RAS".
However, I think the method would work ok if you simply "buried" the dowel deep enough into the 2x4 so that the 2x4 contacts the saw surface, then flip it over so the screws are on top.
Lou

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That may be slightly easier using two scrap boards instead. In either case, his approach is pretty solid. Any type of jig that locks the dowel in place will work, and it's possible to do that using clamps, instead.
For instance, my crosscut sled has provisions for two wood faced clamps to lock down pieces. By using V-shaped edges, it can lock down a dowel.
Remember also, the torque generated is proportional to your depth of cut with each pass. Finally, depending on how clean you need the edges, you might want to cut them first with a standard crosscut blade, before moving to the dado. GerryG

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With a decent crosscut sled (just for dados) and a sharp bladeset, I would just hold and feed. The sled will provide the safety margin.

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The OP wanted to dado 1 inch wide, so multiple passes would be needed. I think you would need to lock/register the dowel somehow. If you're talking (say) 3/4 inch or less (ok, 13/16) then a single pass with "holding/clamping" would be fine (using a sled).
Of course, you would work with long dowels, then chop them to the desired 6 inches.
My 2.
Lou

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I don't suppose you would consider doing it on a router table.
I have never tried to dado a dowel, but I think your concern about torque is well placed. On a router table it would be mostly lateral, which would be easier to hold.
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Hello Igor,
The V block support method will ensure safety. If however you are making many of these dado dowels consider fabricating a support block that fits the dowel perfectly. If you have a drill press run a 1 inch bit through a length of straight and sturdy hardwood then rip it in half to create a non tear-out cradle for your crosscut sled.
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Some snipage>

Having used this practice in the past, I prefer it over V blocks.
Dave
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mine are 3/4", so I stacked 2 pieces of 1x3' about a foot long and drilled a 3/4" hole through them, then connected them with a 1x6" the same length..
What I ended up with looked like an over the fence push stick with a big hole in it.. *g* I'd stick a dowel in the jig, hold on to the long end, and slide it along the fence through the dado blade....
The 1x6" worked to get my dados where I wanted them in the dowel, and after each dado I cut the dowel on the RAS with a stop block, then stuck the end of the dowel into the TS jig and did the next dado..
Repeat until you have enough dowels dado'd or run or of stock.. lol
Mac
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