Cross cutting a dado

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I picked up a stacked dado set last week, and am working on building a simple bookcase. All the shelves will rest in dados, so I'd like to use the dado set to ensure a consistent fit.
Here's the problem: The outer supports are 6' tall, and two shelves must be at the ends of the boards. My table saw won't support a board that long without the board tipping.
I'm looking at building a side stand to support the extra length of the board, but was wondering if anyone else had a suggestion. I don't have a RAS.
Puckdropper
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Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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On 9 Mar, 12:13, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Here in Europe, we do that sort of job with a router against a clamped guide.
In European factories, we'd do it with a sliding table on the cabinet saw (yes, we do have dado sets and the ability to remove crown guards). However big sliding tables cost money and need workshop space, so not many hobbyists have that option.
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Puckdropper wrote:

Router and dado jig.
http://www.popularwoodworking.com/article/Router_Dado_Jig1 / http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-plans/routing/exact-width-dado-jig /
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On 3/9/2010 7:13 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

bigger problem that needs to be solved. Based on what you said it sounds like you are just getting into woodworking (Excuse me if I am wrong.)
The resolution is to build the side table as the need for it will not go away. Today its cutting dados, tomorrow its cutting plywood sheets, the next day it is cutting something else that is to big for your existing system.
The side table could be in the form of removable extensions on the saw, or in an actual side table.
I solved the problem by making a side table (for me it is my work bench) It is based on a 2'X 4' piece of plywood. The top is a frame of half lapped 2"X4" dados to accept the plywood. The rest of the bench is made from 2"X4", all joints half lapped. it has enclosed cabinets at both ends with a two large shelves between the end cabinets. The side table is on wheels.
The side table was carefully measured to be the exact height of my table saw when it is sitting on the floor for use. This side table can be used as an out feed for ripping long pieces of wood and as a support table for large sheet of plywood or long boards.
I like the system because as a part time hobbyist, I can arrange my saw and side table into the best configuration for the project that I am doing. Usually it is placed to the right and slightly behind me so that as I cut a pieced I can turn, place the piece just cut on the table, and pick up the next. All other tools; square, tape measure, pencils etc. are convenient on the side table.
As I have a small shop in my garage, every thing can be rolled to the side and the car placed in the garage when I am not working there.
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Hm... half laps and rabbets. Sounds like a job for a dado stack!
You've mentioned wheels. Are they locking casters, or do you have a system where there's two fixed wheels and two casters? It seems to me locking casters would want to move as a board was slid over the top.
The side table as you describe it sounds like a worthy shop project in and of itself. It'll give me a good place to store the various saw blades and tools I need for the saw.
Puckdropper
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On 3/9/2010 1:34 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

on my table saw. For each half lap I carefully cut the end cut and then sliced through the remaining dado to remove the wood. (The end cut determines the squareness of the table.) Cleaned them up with a chisel.
As for the wheels on my table they are not locking but I have never had a wandering problem with the table. With a caveat, I used the wrong type of wheels. I used four hard rubber swivel casters. The problem after a few years the rubber casters develop flat spots. If I was to do it over again I would use steel caster no rubber or plastic.
Half laps are fun, you should try it, doing it the way I did it, it is especially fun taking out those slices and using the chisel.
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You must have a spectacularly Flat floor. Issue I've had with separate side tables is getting the tops of the saw and table coplanar.
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wrote:

...that's why they make decks of co-dependent playing cards!
cg
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More work than getting out the router ... :)
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On 3/9/2010 6:13 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

Keith' got your solution if you want to use your dado stack.
My setup for the above is a folding roller table (sometimes 2) used as a side extension table for the left tilt table saw, and an mdf sacrificial fence on the table saw.
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page 761
I generally dislike cutting dados with a router unless there is no other way ... too slow ... and to do so on a workpiece that already has dados that have been cut on the table saw, it would be a last resort option.
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On 3/9/10 8:08 AM, Swingman wrote:

Harbor Freight started carrying those roller balls for about a buck a piece, if you decide to make your own.
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

Use "my design" router dado jig and your router.
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"Puckdropper" wrote:

You can buy a commercial roller stand per Swingman's suggestion, or you can build one.
The commercial fold up ones do just that, fold up at just the wrong time or at least mine often would.
Unless you have welding equipment to build metal stands that are adjustable and provide stability, why not take a look at the roller stand that Norm built as a NYW project.
Adjustable, stable and relatively low cost.
BTW, build two (2), you will use them for almost every operation involving large stock such as plywood sheets or long pieces.
Have fun with your dado set.
Lew
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Just bumped one of them and it dropped down 5 inches. It looks like to get a good one I'm going to have to spend some cash. Does Festool make roller stands yet? (Where would the vacuum plug in?)

I found a picture of the stand, and it looks like a good replacement for the junky stands on the roller stands I have.

I do have plans to build an outfeed table for my saw, so an infeed/side table wouldn't be too much harder to do at the same time.
Puckdropper
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"Puckdropper" wrote:

stand I've found.
As I remember, the drawings to build it are part of a "shop jigs" package which makes the $10-$15 for the drawing package a good deal.
I just looked, it's item 0603 and covers a stock cart, roller stand and planer stand.
Lew
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On 09 Mar 2010 22:58:56 GMT, the infamous Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> scrawled the following:

Yeah. They're $1,950 for the kit and come with a built in brush, vacuum, and grain comb (top and bottom on all.) The infeed roller preheats the wood so it isn't shocked from the warmth of the sander or planer blades cutting it. The outfeed roller stains and polys the wood (to any one of 1,864 different fake woodgrains) after masking off any rabbets, dadoes, and edges, pretrimming the blue tape afterwards.
Buy two sets. They're small.
I can see Swingy and Leon drooling for them right now. Can't you?
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On 3/10/2010 5:49 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Hehe ... New Festool stuff!? Damn, thought it was Rob's meatball thread that had my mouth watering!
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I made my workbench the same height as my table saw. The saw sets at the end of my workbench, and acts as an extension for the saw for cross cutting. The saw is on rollers and can be turned 90 deg. for ripping plywood. Also my radial saw, is at the same height and sets next to the table saw, so they all support each other. The rip fence on the T/S makes a perfect stop for the R/S when making cutoffs. I have my shop a small 2 car garage and space is very limited.
Joe "Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

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I measured my bench. 1/4" taller than the saw. Rats. When I get the garshop switched around, I'm going to flip the bench over on its back and cut its legs down. Then put leveling feet in there so I can make sure it's exactly the same height as my TS.
I wound up raising the saw a little bit and getting close enough. The dados have all been cut, and it's almost time to test the fit.
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper wrote:

Not really a big deal. 1/4" over 6' would be pretty small angle, 2/10th's of a degree I think. If your shop is in a garage or basement with floor drains, the floor slopes anyway, so unless the table is adjustable or attached to the saw, it will vary depending on where the saw is located.
When I get the

Pictures of 2' tall work bench flash in my head:-)
Then put leveling feet in there so I can make sure

My work bench and side tables are the same as the table saw. Also, my jointer fence which is next to the TS on the same bench is the same height as the saw table (
http://jbstein.com/Flick/TSBench2.jpg ). I rarely use the router to cut dado's, but the end of a 6' board would be around the limit for me on the TS.

Hmmm, I test the fit before I even cut one production dado, and after the first cut, at least...
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