Corded Drill Recommendations

I find that sometimes I need a drill to do a bit more than what my 18V cordless seem comfortable doing. I have 3 Cordless drills, 1 is a 14.4v and 2 are 18v, all seem to have plenty of power for most things but sometimes drilling a bunch of pilot holes or using a spade bit or hole saw, they just seem to be straining. Using my drill press is just not feasible for everything, so I have decided I need a corded drill as a backup, or maybe as an addition.
I think I need the following:
1/2" Keyless chuck Variable Speed Reversable
I do not think I need:
A clutch A hammer drill
This also seems to be a solution that shouldn't cost me my first born child (tho you are welcome to him or the second too). I figured in the 75 bucks range new or reconditioned.
Any recommendations? Or any good prices?
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Neillarson wrote:

I have yet to use the capabilities of the 1/2" chuck, but my dad uses his for mixing drywall mud. I don't know if you'll find a new 1/2" drill in the price range you mentioned.
I've had a 3/8" 4.8A Dewalt drill for years, and it's done everything I asked of it including driving 1/2" lag bolts into 4x4s. It's complained, but never failed. Its max speed is 1200rpm, but this gives it more torque at the low end. The current equivalent appears to be the DW222.
Chris
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My favorite 1/2" drill is the Hitachi D13VF. 9 amps. I've pushed mine hard and it has performed very well.
Max
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I added a corded to my collection about a year ago, and I've used it a lot. I got a reconditioned Dewalt D21008K; it was about $35 on eBay. They're currently available for $45 + shipping at toolking.com. It's only a 3/8" chuck, but that hasn't been a problem for me - if a bit is larger than 3/8", it will go in the DP. I chose the 3/8" over the 1/2 both for price and the higher RPM offered by the smaller drill. (My brad point bits are reduced shank, though, which makes a big difference and lets me use them in the 3/8 drill.) I looked closely at some of the Makita corded drills, as those were also reasonably priced, but I just picked the Dewalt because I got a good deal on it. I don't own one, but from what I've read, Milwaukee is top of the line for drills, and they're priced accordingly. Probably worth it if you'll use the drill all the time. Another thing to consider is that there is a 1/2" Jacobs brand chuck available that attaches to most 3/8" drills - that's Jacobs model # 31037. Good luck, Andy
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I would go with your thoughts of size, variable speed, and reversible. However, often 1/2" drills are slower running than 3/8" drills. IMHO if you get only one, go with the 3/8" chuck. I already have 3/8" and would go 1/2" this time. If you can get the clutch feature that would also be nice but those are few and far in between. For $75 you can look at DeWalt maybe a little more for Milwaukee.
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As I also "sometimes" have similar needs, I picked up this model at Harbor Freight: http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberE338 I was looking mainly for a variable speed drill for occasional use with some 1/2" brad point bits that I could not use in my old reliable 3/8" Craftsman. It has had plenty of power with 1 1/4" spade bits and a 3" inch hole saw. It has a high enough speed to work well with my Kreg pocket hole bit, which requires 2000 rpm; none of my cordless drills come close. I've never used the hammer function on this drill, never needed it. A keyless chuck might be nice, but I haven't lost the key yet. After four years, I'm happy with it. Like most HF items I've bought, it gets the job done. If I had to begin making a living with it, I might consider a more expensive drill.
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I'm curious about this requirement - I've never used my Kreg pocket hole bit at full speed, and it's seemed to work fine. In fact, if I had to guess, I'd say it works better at slower speeds, and with a brief pullout to clear chips. Is this in the Kreg literature? Andy
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Damn I like this board. So I followed the first piece of advice and bought a Dewalt D21008K on Ebay that I found NIB for $41 and some change delivered. I think I will also pickup the Harbor Freight 1/2 VSR Hammer drill. I figure for $30 it would be good to have around for a backup.
Thanks for your help.
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If your thinking of drilling concrete you might give the HF SDS drill a look....I just got the 1 inch model for $40.00(sidewalk sale) and it cuts through concrete like butter, they even included a few bits and a chisel.......no comparison to my 1/2 non hammer Dewalt (works great on wood and stiring things).....I don't drill concrete often but saving a hour a hole won't bother me a bit...... Rod
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The Kreg rep recommended a faster speed when I bought my jig some 12-14 years ago. I see a notable difference in performance between using a slower battery operated drill and a faster corded drill. The holes come out cleaner with the faster drill also.
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Yes, Kreg states this. In this case, as is the case with most cutting of soft material. speed is not at all critical. I believe that they recommend a higher speed as most people have difficulty controlling their feedrate. For the same feedrate, higher speed reduces chip load resulting in a smoother cut. You can do the same at a slower speed by reducing feed rate (as you have apparently realized).

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Having used both a 1/2" battery driven DeWalt, and a 3/8" corded DeWalt to cut pocket holes, unless there is no place to plug in, the battery driven tool gets to drive the screws. There is no contest. Drilling the holes eats battery time AND clock time, and offers no noticeable benefits.
Patriarch
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I have the same drill. The hammer part is great for putting those blue screw into my shop's concrete walls.
I was singing the praises of this drill right up to two weeks ago when it stopped working. It was lightly used. I think the switch went bad. The switch is "sealed" up and hard to get at the guts for repairs.
Bill Leonhardt
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I will third the Milwaukee. I have had my 1/2" hole shooter for about 12 years now and I have only had a cordless for couple of years. My dad's Milwaukee did die on him (It was 50+ years old and I saw an identical one on the History Channel's "History of Tools"). I love the all metal jacobson keyless chuck but I am the only one that seems to be able to figure out how to use it. The chuck ratchets like an impact wrench instead of being smooth like a cordless drill keyless chuck. The hole shooter was the only drill I could find with good low speed torque and still have good highspeed performance. Yes it will "rip your arm off". I also enjoy doing a lot of metal working so a cordless just doesn't cut it. I firmly believe a Milwaukee 1/2" hole shooter is all the drill most people will ever need BUT I have grown to appreciate my Dewalt 18v cordless.
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snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net says...

http://www.metabousa.com/metabo/handgefuehrte/us/en/produkte/drills /
would always be my first choice in corded drills. Your second-born will still use that 20 years down the track more likely than not. (2 of my 3 expired lately, one aged ~38 years, the other ~25years. The third is about 30 and still going strong).
as for "price-driven" I'd look for the usual suspects, Bosch, Makita, Hitachi. AEG used to make some medal winning drills and some really crap ones - I'd stay away from them if I didn't know which model. Ryobi are crap anyway, i.m.o. B & D used to be underpowered and underengineered 30 years ago, at least the models we got in Europe at the time. Don't know if that was their entire range though, and haven't looked at them since.
-P.
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wrote:

My cordless died 12 years ago and I have not replaced it with a cordless. No regrets. I have a 1/2" chuck Milwaukee. It has a detachable side handle (which I seldom use). Lots of power, never dies. It was over $100, but well worth the quality.
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I'll second the Milwaukee brand. I have 2- 3/8" Makita, corded vsr drills, and have had B&D and Dewalt. The Dewalt, my friend bought and out of the box the chuck had a lot of wobble. It was returned for another, of the same "quality?" I found a Milwaukee 3/8 vsr corded drill at a garage sale for $10, and it is now my favorite drill. Makes the others feel like Crapsman drills. Yeah I've had them also! I wouldn't trade the Milwaukee 3/8 vsr corded drill , for a new Makita, or Dewalt. Milwaukee is my pick, by far, over the others.
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I have one of these.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)73446439&sr=1-1
I bought it because my 3/8" Bosch corded was simply not up to the task of some high-torque applications (auger bit into hardwood or pushing a 2" forstner bit.)
I'm pleased with the Milwaukee. it does what it does really well, but it's not really an general pourpose drill. I suspect you may find the same true of most 1/2" drills on the market. 1/2" drill are best suited to high-torque, low RPM applications.
But you already have a 3 cordless drills which are presumably pretty good general purpose drills

I doubt that you want that. For high-torque applications you *want* a keyed chuck.
I have 2 cordless drills a 7.2 Hitachi and a 12V Panasonic
The little guy is light and comfy for pilot holes and modest screwing. As I'm sure you are aware, it's nice to have two cordless drills so that when drilling pilot holes and screwing so that you don't have to switch bits too much.
The panasonic has a clutch... a nice feature for some screwing applications (like *screwing* Kreg pocket holes)
My Bosh 3/8 drill has a keyless chuck, and is good for higher RPM corded duty (can you say *drilling* pocket holes). But as previously stated, not for brutal torque applications.
Like you, I have a drill press... really flexible as lone as you don't need portability.
And then the 1/2".... for all that torque you pay a price (not just the initial cash outlay). Slower (max) RPM and weight (a little less comfy to use).
Cordless drills come and go with the battery technology, and if you are like me, you use the corless when you can and corded when you must. Consequently, the corded tools don't get that much use. A corded drill can be a lifetime investment. I did not really mind plunking down $125 dir a 1/2" drill that I know I will probably use a few times a year because I suspect that it will around for several decades.
-Steve
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"Stephen M" wrote

"Modest screwing". Now there's an interesting expression.
Max
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Makita makes a "light" 3/8" drill that is excellent in the $100 range.
A 1/2" is a slow turner and would not be the drill needed for something like a "Kreg" jig or other drilling applications.
Get a 3/8" for every day use. Most drills today are variable speed and reversible.
Neillarson wrote:

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