Chipboard Repair

I'm trying to repair a wall unit that was damaged during transport. Basically a harsh stop forced the door to drop and the sudden drop smashed the hinges and tore out some other supports. Trying to reattach the door I've discovered that the wood will no longer accepted new screws, the old ones being lost in the truck. Like I said this is because the screws were torn from the chipboard under force! I'm trying to figure out ways that I can make possible repairs to the chipboard that would allow the screws to be recieved and the weight of the door to be accepted again by the supports. The unit in question is a bar unit and the door acts as an area to pour drinks. The inside of the door had a mirrored sheet of glass (yet to be replaced).
Still looking for the hinges too! Who'd have thought they'd be a nuisance to find!!
Before anyone suggests replacing the unit or the door, the unit is part of a set of units and any replacements would be out of place. A new unit is impossible because it was built late 70's/ early 80's. It came from my parents and I rather like the thing!
Many Thanks
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I don't totally understand the damage from the description. In a typical stripped out screw hole we will take a bundle of toothpicks or something like that, glom them with wood glue and tap them into the hole. Let dry, trim flush, screw away.

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Car body filler works 100% for this. I have repaired old cupboards with hinges torn out time and again.
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On Wed, 24 Sep 2008 16:55:22 -0700 (PDT), TrailRat

Particleboard and chipboard don't hold screws very well, but I've found that a piano hinge holds just fine. I guess it is the number of screws that does the trick.
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TrailRat wrote:

Time for "snot" AKA: Epoxy thickened with microballoons.
Aggressively remove all damaged areas with 60 grit right angle sander.
Drill out all screw holes with a 3/4 dia bit.
Think of yourself as a dentist removing tooth decay before filling.
Once all damaged material has been removed, mix up some laminating epoxy thickened with epoxy to the consistency of stiff snot and putty all damaged areas proud.
Lay unit on side and tape underside of holes to trap snot in 3/4 holes.
Allow to cure 48 hours, then sand repair flush and drill hinge holes as required.
When unit has returned to compost, epoxy patch will still be there,
Lew
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A pencil sharpener will put a cone on a small dowel. Cut the cone off and glue it in the old screw hole. After trimming the cone flush, drill a pilot hole and insert the new screw. You can also whittle the cones, but a pencil sharpener is quicker.
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If you have a largish area of tear out, you can fill with enough sawdust and glue to make a thick mixture and fill, let dry day or so, then sand, color the repair with a wax stick to match, then redrill You could also fill with a reddish tinted bondo, (a little more hardener in the mix) and redrill If just a small tear out of the hole, then fill with a piece of glued in dowel and redrill with a good brad point bit. Better yet, drill with a hinge centering bit which will prevent the hole from getting off center in the hinge plate, CC
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Ordinary woodfillers are much too weak for this, go with car body filler.
The recessed hinges should be available at any BM or diy shed. There are 2 sizes, and a few different opening patterns. Or you might have sprung surface hinges - who knows.
NT
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TrailRat wrote:

What sort of hinges & where is the damage in relation to them? Picky?
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
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On 25 Sep, 08:13, "The Medway Handyman"

The hinges are a flush fitting flap hinges. They look like a number 8. The damage to the wood isn't there though. The hinges themselves smashed at the pin which makes them unusable now. Part metal, part plastic these things were!! The damage to the wood is where the fall flap stays were attached. The actual stays weren't damaged, just the locations where they were mounted.
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Exactly.
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A pic wuld be nice,we can all mae assumptions how to repair it but some types of repair are not fiting for the job.
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George wrote:

Car body filler every time.
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The Hinges -
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v297/TrailRat/P9251022.jpg
The Damage -
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v297/TrailRat/P9251026.jpg
And the unit -
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v297/TrailRat/P9251029.jpg
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wrote:

I would just have moved the hinges a couple of inches further along. And tidied up the damage with filler.
--
Bartc


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With damage that small you could just araldite a bit of dowel in there, no need to go out and get anything.
NT
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TrailRat wrote:

You might find a suitable replacement hinge here:
<http://www.blum.com/gb/en/index.php
Note: Their catalogues are the big PDF documents and have *lots* of hinges and detail in them - including fixing positions, screw sizes, etc.
If so, you (probably) can get them from:
<http://www.isaaclord.co.uk/
even if it needs a special order.
--
Rod

Hypothyroidism is a seriously debilitating condition with an insidious
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