Cardboard? under wood sills on concrete slab

Pulled an old rotted out sill off (having removed the old rotted out wall above it--it was too far gone to be worth trying to save) and found under the sill something that looks like soaking wet cardboard, about the thickness of corrugated board. I'm curious as to whether the use of such a substance was ever standard practice.
Upon further investigation it appears to be just a couple of sheets of Kraft paper--whatever it was I scraped the sodden remains off, pressure washed the area (and got all the spider eggs and cocoons and deceased insects and the like off the areas that will be hidden when the wall goes back up), ran a thread chaser down the bolts, which were in surprisingly good condition, and once it dries I should be good to go on the new sill, this time with purpose-made plastic sill seal and pressure treated sills and CopperCoat (Wolman's half-strength Cuprinol-equivalent, the real stuff being unobtainable locally, at least not without waiting for a special order) on the theoretically unexposed areas that were rotted on the pieces I removed.
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Going back to my olds architect class days in the early 70's IIRC there was a felt like material that was soaked with a tar like substance that went between the sill plate and the foundation. Different building codes in different areas had different requirements. This was in Corpus Christi, TX.
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"Leon" wrote

was
TX.
A polyurethane type "sill sealer tape" is now routinely placed between the bottom double sill place and the concrete foundation to act as both a gap filler, moisture barrier, and an air filtration barrier. In some areas this is required by energy codes.
It's so cheap to do, and the benefits so large, that only an idiot wouldn't do it.
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It's a sill sealer.
On Sat, 17 May 2008 13:59:31 -0400, "J. Clarke"

Tom Watson tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet www.home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
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How have you decided to isolate your old steel j bolts away from the new ACQ treated lumber? PVC sleeve?
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DanG wrote:

If they are 1/2" in diameter or larger noting is required.
"2006 International Residential Code - Fastener Statement - section R319.3
Fasteners for pressure-preservative and fire-retardant treated wood shall be of hot-dipped zinc-coated galvanized steel, stainless steel, silicon bronze or copper. The coating weights for zinc-coated fasteners shall be in accordance with ASTM-A153.
Exceptions:
----> 1. One-half-inch (12.7 mm) diameter or larger steel bolts. <------
2. Fasteners other than nails and timber rivets shall be permitted to be of mechanically deposited zinc-coated steel with coating weights in accordance with ASTM-B695, Class 55, minimum."
http://www.postcaps.com/fastener.htm
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Given these wonderful requirements, how is it that the "hot-dipped zinc-coated galvanized steel" screws I put into my green wood deck structure all rotted while only the "stainless steel" seem to be surviving after only 10 years.
I have not tried the "silicon bronze" but I do know that the "copper" are really nice in a boat that is nearing 50. I must admit the screws are all covered with fiberglass and resin.
From what little empirical evidence I have, only copper and stainless are the way to go. Only drawback I have seen with the copper is their fragility.
P D Q
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PDQ wrote:

rotted while > only the "stainless steel" seem to be surviving after only 10 years.

Perhaps the screws did not meet the ASTM-A153 standard for coating thickness. The approved fasteners are often referred to as double hot dipped.
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zinc-coated > galvanized steel" screws I put into my green wood deck structure all

I have been making a minuter of Diesel Fuel and old roof shingles and tar paper to try and stop carpenter bees and to treat exposed barn siding and such. It dries - eventually - to form what appears (after a year or so) to be a pretty good waterproof coating that lets the wood show through, too.
I also recall reading that Boric Acid solution is used to treat fresh lumber to inhibit or prevent termite damage. So I sprayed the wood in my Florida Shed with that before putting up the siding and interior panels.
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Nova wrote:

I should have mentioned that it's a shed.
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