Carbide turning tools

I am just getting started turning bowls, etc. I don't have a lot of tools and am looking at buying a carbide tipped tool, like Rockler sells or something off of Ebay.
My question is they say that they give a long lasting cutting life. I don't know what that means relative to using a HSS and sharpening frequently when turning. In other words how often do I need to expect to replace the tip with another $20 tip.
I welcome any comments.
Al
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"Al Holstein" :

------------------------------------------------------ Leon? Where are you?
Lew
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Over here Lew!
Houston
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"Al Holstein" wrote in message
I am just getting started turning bowls, etc. I don't have a lot of tools and am looking at buying a carbide tipped tool, like Rockler sells or something off of Ebay.
My question is they say that they give a long lasting cutting life. I don't know what that means relative to using a HSS and sharpening frequently when turning. In other words how often do I need to expect to replace the tip with another $20 tip.
I welcome any comments.
Al
I sharpen my carbide router bits with a diamond file. Could you do this with the lathe tools also instead of replacing them ?? WW
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Al Holstein wrote:

am looking at buying a carbide tipped tool, like Rockler sells or something off of Ebay.

know what that means relative to using a HSS and sharpening frequently when turning. In other words how often do I need to expect to replace the tip with another $20 tip.

Maybe you could post a link to the tool you are referring to?
I think the general philosophy on cutting tools around here is that you get what you pay for. Thus, if what you have to spend is $20, then your decision is made.
Since the work is passing by so fast ina lathe, gouges dull much faster than when used for carving, for instance.
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On 1/4/2013 10:44 PM, Bill wrote:

The $20 is for a new cutting tip for the turning tool after the initial one dulls. Actually a $20 tip is relatively on the high side of replacements tips. IIRC most are $17.

And or technically all of these carbide tipped type tools are scrapers.
http://www.easywoodtools.com /
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Leon wrote:

Thanks for the lesson and the link!
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On Sat, 05 Jan 2013 09:26:40 -0600, Leon wrote:

And even that's a little high - take a look at:
http://www.woodchuck-tools.com/Inserts.htm
I've got his "bowl-pro" tool and it's great - ever bit as good as the high priced spread. And now he has one that takes both the square and round cutters.
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Wow. Those are way less expensive. I wonder if they will work on other brands.
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On 1/4/2013 9:57 PM, Al Holstein wrote:

am looking at buying a carbide tipped tool, like Rockler sells or something off of Ebay.

know what that means relative to using a HSS and sharpening frequently when turning. In other words how often do I need to expect to replace the tip with another $20 tip.

I have had a lathe for the past 30+ years. I have use it/them probably 20 hours in those 30 years, up until this past August. I switched/have quit using all of my traditional turning tools and now use "3" different Easy Wood Tools tools, all carbide tipped.
I have absolutely used my lathe at leas as much in the last 4 months as the previous 30 years.
There is no learning curve providing you read the simple instructions and watch a few YouTube video's. I have not changed the cutting edge on any of the tool yet much less replaced one yet.
As WW mentioned get a diamond hone and work the top screw side of the carbide tip a few passes and you can extend the life of the tips, so I have been also told.
So far I have done all my turning with the 3 tools and have not yet sense use the traditional tools.
Wood craft indicated that a tip should last approximately long enough to turn 300 pens.
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I also am fairly new to turning and bought the Hunter 4 and am still making friends with it. John Lucas has a nice YouTube demo on it. When I figure out the correct position to present the tool to the wood, I think I will be quite satisfied.
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A coworker of mine who also turns indicates he has a friend in a machine shop who can make any of those tips for a few bucks. My coworker plans to stock up on each shape. He said he'll get me some as well.
I've also read the same on this group from those who had a machine shop make them as well. Maybe they will chime in.
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"Meanie" wrote in message
A coworker of mine who also turns indicates he has a friend in a machine shop who can make any of those tips for a few bucks. My coworker plans to stock up on each shape. He said he'll get me some as well.
I've also read the same on this group from those who had a machine shop make them as well. Maybe they will chime in. ====================================================================They don't make them, they buy them. Making them takes a lot more specialized machinery than a machine shop would have. Not cost effective. That said, the man in the machine shop probably knows that these are metalworking inserts that can be had for less than half the price the woodworking places charge. As low a $2.00 to $3.00.
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The $2-$3 carbide inserts probably are negative rake and have a significant radius on the cutting edge to make them more rugged. That's fine if you are removing lots of metal, but I doubt they'd work well in wood. If you have the appropriate grinding equipment, you could put a shaper edge on them, but they wouldn't necessarily fit the holder tightly afterward.
The really sharp ones tend to be a bit pricier. Even so, the "scary sharp" positive rake inserts I use for plastic & aluminum are ~ $10-$12 each.
Doug White
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"Doug White" wrote in message

The $2-$3 carbide inserts probably are negative rake and have a significant radius on the cutting edge to make them more rugged. That's fine if you are removing lots of metal, but I doubt they'd work well in wood. If you have the appropriate grinding equipment, you could put a shaper edge on them, but they wouldn't necessarily fit the holder tightly afterward.
The really sharp ones tend to be a bit pricier. Even so, the "scary sharp" positive rake inserts I use for plastic & aluminum are ~ $10-$12 each. =================================================================================Depends on where you buy them. For woodworking tools, Chinese made are fine. Even the premium ones such as you are using are around half the price of the woodworking inserts.
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On 1/5/2013 7:12 PM, Doug White wrote:

Turning inserts for metal working can be commonly ordered with a tool nose radius as small as .007". Actually .031" to .047" is very typical for NC turning in metal. Another nice thing about metal working inserts is that they can have as many as four cutting edges, nearly all have at least two edges. The machine shop guy that someone mentioned may be handing out used inserts that are no longer suitable for metal but more than adequate for cutting wood. Carbide inserts are inexpensive and not worth sharpening in a modern machine shop, considering hourly wages, overhead etc. They are generally collected in bulk (separated by grade) and then sold for scrap value the same as the metal chips created in the machining process.
John
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On Fri, 4 Jan 2013 19:57:53 -0800 (PST), Al Holstein
am looking at buying a carbide tipped tool, like Rockler sells or something off of Ebay.

know what that means relative to using a HSS and sharpening frequently when turning. In other words how often do I need to expect to replace the tip with another $20 tip.

I have been doing bowls for about 3 years. I could not master the use of skews or gouges and exclusively use scraper and sanding blocks. Advanced turners say you should master all the turning tools. I am not sure of the reason. If I had to I wouldn't be using a lathe.
Recently I bought a carbide bit tool. A 1/2" by 13" bar and four carbide bits from http://eddiecastelin.com/ It was easy to make a handle. The cost was $45. The tool allows me to get places that the scrapers can't inside some bowls. It is not as aggressive as a sharp scraper but I seem to be able to work it at further distance from the tool rest. I can't comment on longevity yet. Design of the tool is very simple.
Some of my humble bowls made on a Harbor Freight lathe with HF tools, most of which, except for the scrapers, sit idle are at:
http://ray80538.home.comcast.net/~ray80538/SegmentedBowl/segbowl.html
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am looking at buying a carbide tipped tool, like Rockler sells or something off of Ebay.

know what that means relative to using a HSS and sharpening frequently when turning. In other words how often do I need to expect to replace the tip with another $20 tip.

It's funny how that works, I am totally at ease with a skew, but sometime have trouble with a gouge. Can't use the skew much on the inside of the bowl so I'm learning. I'm finding the better I get at sharpening the gouges the easier it is to find the bevel and present it properly.
Mike M
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On Sat, 05 Jan 2013 12:35:38 -0700, Ray wrote:

Wow! That's even lower cost than the Woodchuck stuff - let us know how it works over time.
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On Saturday, January 5, 2013 9:27:53 AM UTC+5:30, Al Holstein wrote:

am looking at buying a carbide tipped tool, like Rockler sells or something off of Ebay.

know what that means relative to using a HSS and sharpening frequently when turning. In other words how often do I need to expect to replace the tip with another $20 tip.

Normally High Speed Steel (HSS)Tungsten Carbide Tools give long life, but that is based on the how often we use and the hardness of the metal we want to cut.
The sharpness of the tip is often checked and we have to sharpen properly when blunted.
If you want to know quality of those tools, you can check such sites. http://www.sptools.co.in/cutting_tools.html
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