Can't lift grime of table saw

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On Fri, 1 Jan 2010 08:14:21 -0700, Max wrote

I used gasoline as a degreaser when I was a kid in the 60's/70's. The then 'new' unleaded was like using water. A real disappointment!
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I read somewhere that it was intended for internal combustion engines. :-)
Max
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You don't use it by the gallon. You just put a little on a rag, then set the can away from where you are working. Outside, preferably.
And never run with scissors in your hand. You could put yer eye out.
Steve
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No you are supposed to soak the whole saw in it while smoking. The flames will reduce the residue (and the saw) to nothing. Then when you wake up in the burn unit, You can think about what new saw you want.
I have used in the past.....gas, kerosene, diesel (works great on getting really thick grease off of your hands), brake cleaner, pumice hand cleaner, a wire cup for an angle grinder, a heat gun and scraper, an automotive or industrial degreaser, or the sandpaper route. Though with the sandpaper route, I would start at 150 grit and on a half sheet sander.
You might want to try penetrating oil and a scotch brite pad as well.
Allen (who is running with scissors and untied shoes after I have put out a grease fire with a big cup of water)
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And never remove the guard from a table saw. And Radial arm saws are extremely dangerous. And dust explosions have happened in ungrounded dust collection systems And...........................
Max
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I was just throwing gas on Jim Yanik's gas paranoia fire.
Steve
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I surmised as much. I thought I would add a little fuel.
Max
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How in the heck did we survive? Lawn darts. Lead paint. Spud guns. Stuff they have taken off the shelves and now you have to pay big bucks on ebay. We've protected the current generation from so much harm and evil and dangerous things.
And look at the results. Now instead of your brother stapling you with the Arrow T50 stapler, they go pay fifty bucks for someone to do it to them.
Steve
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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
I've always considered that lead paint was a leading cause of our current batch of politicians and the people who elect and support them. <Grin>
--
Nonny

ELOQUIDIOT (n) A highly educated, sophisticated,
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No need to pay. I did my own.
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Sam Takoy wrote:

Time to think outside the smallest room in the house:
1. Propane torch. 2. Sandblasting. 3. Belt sander.
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First of all, I'd use a half or quarter sheet sander with 120grit dry, after scraping off everything as best you can with a putty knife. That should get you down to metal and if the sandpaper comes out clean, the stain won't be passed along to your work, when you use the table.
Another excellent little product is BRAKE PARTS CLEANER spray. It comes in two formula, and I'd try each. This stuff works great for about anything, but I'd use it outdoors. Spray and scrub in with 0000 steel wool, then immediately wipe. It evaporates like crazy and is flammable, so again, work outdoors with nothing sparking.
If you aren't worried about what happens, try some muriatic acid in a tiny area, wiping it off quickly.
--
Nonny

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"Nonny" wrote:

Yep.
Top make look like ugly on an ape, but if sandpaper remains clean, so what?

Again Yep, it's my weapon of choice, but only outside.
Has lots of VOCs, be careful.
Lew
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For some things, bathroom cleaner (such as "scrubbing bubbles" brand) seems to work when most other cleaners fail. I don't know if tarry goo is on that list or not.
Sometimes, too, I find a traditional scrub brush (or old toothbrush or such like) is more effective than an abrasive; the bristles tend to get down in the little divots and rough bits of the surface better.
--
Andrew Erickson

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Sam Takoy wrote:

My favorite: napalm.
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wrote:

Tide and white gas, sticks good too like a gel stripper. Where is that Willy P (the igniters are the only munition that made me shake).
Mark
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On 1/1/2010 10:41 AM, Markem wrote:

Firing a 1000m HOB of "Willy P" on a grid intersection saved my ass on many an occasion ... poor man's GPS! :)
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Try using Duct Tape to stick on the surface, it may stick to what you rant to remove. I have used tape to lift lots of those gummy adjesives that solvents dont seem to permanently desolve.
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In

Have you tried just a heat gun and putty knife?
Xylene seems to get about anything IME. Pour it on, let it set, pour some more on, scrape, then use medium steel wool. Most hardware stores/paint stores carry it. Very explosive! Keep good ventilation in mind.
Twayne
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I'd be inclined to take a scraper to it, even a card scraper, to remove the build up. Clearly this requires some care so as to not score the surface but it shouldn't be a big deal. After the scraper use coarse Scotch Brite pads with WD40, kerosene, (or gasoline!) to remove the rest of the asphalt. Another solvent that would probably work is sold in the automotive stores as bug and tar remover.
Another mechanical means would be to use an auto body float (file from the lead sled days) or file designed for flattening cast iron surfaces. Both are not commonly available today, and require skill to use, but old serviceable ones can be found.
I equate this problem to cleaning up a maple cutting board counter top that had gotten all gooey... the owner attempted to sand it but the paper clogged up instantly. I took a Stanley No 80 scraper to it and had it ready for mineral oil in a matter of minutes.
John
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