Buy a jig or have them done by CNC?

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The Rockler jig comes with a brad poing vix type bit that is self clearing and does not eat away at the jig.
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On 4/5/10 7:57 AM, Leon wrote:

That's the same one I got from Woodcraft. Those bits are great, but mine had trouble with clogging and the clog would make it stick in the depressed position.
It got frustrating having to whack the thing every two or three holes to clear the clog. Maybe it was the plywood, maybe it was just a case getting what you paid for, maybe they've improved the bits. Just FYI, for anyone looking into it. Maybe buy it local, in you can, so you can return it.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Norm made one on The New Yankee Workshop. And CNC is a bit overkill. You don't need that level of accuracy. Phil Brown
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"Phil Brown" wrote:

Yep, made one for a router equipped with a 5/8" bushing.
Then a few years later, he was seen using this one with a drill.
http://tinyurl.com/yeu78jo
The drill version is a whole lot easier to use, IMHO.
Lew
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On 4/6/2010 1:31 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

OTOH, it doesn't get much easier than typing a short command line and pressing "Enter" at the CNC console - then watching (or not) as the tool does a faultless job.
The overkill part is knowing in advance that none of the shelves will wobble. ;-)
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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wrote:

Not after the TiteBond-II sets, anyway.
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That was my thoughts, the g code would take minutes to write and thus would be very cheap particularly as a local company would of done them in exchange for some repair work I did on a controller last year. Still I have gone with a cheap jig and will keep that favor in the bank for when cnc routing is a better fit.
cheers Stuart
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On 4/6/2010 5:45 PM, Stuart Pearson wrote:

The jig should do a passable job for you - and you shouldn't be misled by my (smallish-minded) attempts to remind the Festool crowd that those tools aren't the final word in speed, accuracy, and ease of use. ;)
FWIW, I would expect that nearly all CNC routing shops already have a code block to drill or rout holes on a parameter-controlled grid. Even before my machine was delivered I had written that routine and another to rout all the holes in Euro-style cabinets. I never made any kitchen cabinets, but I've (re)used the grid-drilling code a fair amount. You should probably revise their programming time to somewhere near zero.
Since you know enough to help them out with their controller, let me encourage you to think about a project like
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/JBot /
Not only might you find something like fun to build and play with, but it's a wonderful jig- and template-making tool. :)
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Now why did you have to go and suggest that, I was finally getting some of my projects completed and now you have given me the idea for a new one! ;)
Must admit I have considered it before but is only with my recent house move I have had the space and it does sound like a fun project. Nice site by the way.
Cheers Stuart
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On 4/9/2010 2:06 PM, Stuart Pearson wrote:

It's a good project to let simmer until winter, then stretch the design work out until spring. It's not a big challenge so much as a collection of tiny ones. At the end, the satisfaction from watching it work is all out of proportion to the size of the machine and the work that went into constructing it.
The most surprising part of the project for me was how much less complicated the electronics were than I had imagined.

If you decide to build one, you're invited to consider me a resource - and if you have difficulty finding (or ordering) parts, I may be able to help.

Thanks - it's actual proof that if one can just take enough photos, at least some few are bound to turn out as intended. :)
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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On Fri, 09 Apr 2010 16:43:39 -0500, the infamous Morris Dovey

I ended up with 287 or so pics inside the Wildlife Safari in Winston, OR that one morning I went. Digital cameras rule. ;)
-- Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature's peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees. The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop away from you like the leaves of Autumn. -- John Muir
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