Bracing a short wall

Bathroom remodel. I am installing a short (30 inches high) stud wall at the end of the new tub. Tub is the type ("Integral Apron") that requires a wall on three sides. I will build the short end-wall using 6" studs, since it will look better and stronger.
Does anybody have good ideas on how to 'steady' this short wall so that the free corner does not rock? My main wall, perpendicular to this short wall and 2x4 construction, is still open and I can place whatever additional framing necessary within.
All comments appreciated.
Ivan Vegvary
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BTW, wall is to be 32 inches long.

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Lag bolt the bottom to the joists or floor below, skin it in plywood to make a torsion box, use screws anywhere you thought nails were going, don't skimp on construction adhesive
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If the tub is fastened to the short wall, it should help stabilize the wall, especially if it's a steel tub.
Otherwise, I would run a post down into the floor and bolt it to the side of a floor joist. If the post ends up in between two joists, you could add solid blocking in the floor and bolt the post to that.
Depending on the design of the tub, you may be able to run a wood or metal tie between the short wall and the full wall on the opposite end. The tie would sit behind the apron, and should be as high as you can go and still allow the tub to clear it.
Another option, install a post on the open end that runs all the way to the ceiling. The wall would still be open except for the post on the corner. You could even install a towel rod between the post and wall if you wish.
Anthony
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Attach the tub to it.
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I had the same situation when I did my bathroom remodel, and as long as the flange of the tub is going to be attached to the framing, you don't need to take any extreme measures, other than nailing your 2x6's securely. Even a lightweight fiberglass tub is going to stiffen the wall sufficiently - I tiled the top of the wall I built, and the grout hasn't cracked in almost a decade of use.
Scott
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