Biesemeye set up questions


I just assembled a new Unisaw and it cuts wood like a knife through butter. I have a few questions though and not sure if I am being too picky. I picked up a set of fractional calipers and the superbar to help in the set up and I found out a few things. Again, not sure that I need to be so bloody perfect but given the coin I just spend I want to make sure I have a dialed in set up.
1. The fence has a small bow to it right next to where the blade starts. its about .003 inches. I adjusted the fence to the ends are aligned but here a small varience in the fence. I assume that wont be a big deal but just want to know what the experts think
2. The extension table has a bow in it right in the middle of the table about 1/16 if an inch. should I sent it back or make a new one
Thanks in advance. If I am being too bloody picky let me know so I can leave well enought along. Seems like since I can measure to a precision of .001 I am fixiated on getting it exact :)
Finally, I am interested in building an auxillary fence for the biesemeyer and was thinking of drilling some holes in the center of the top of the fence and taping them so I can get some bolts to hold the aux fence to the biesemeyer. Any comments or gotchas with this set up. I was planning to build the set up from an older shop notes that I have.
Best regards
KC
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On Sun, 30 Apr 2006 19:33:04 -0700, "Kevin Coleman"

I'll be honest, I haven't even checked mine. I wouldn't think that .003 would be a problem though.

I've never seen the factory model so I'm not sure how they are put together. Making a new one is not a problem and might be a good first project for the new saw. As for the one you have, depending on how it's constructed, could you shim under the cross braces (if there are any) to raise the surface to where you need it?
Mike O.
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I think we have identified the problem.
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how's the saw cut?
anything else is irrelevant.
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.003 is beyond anal in woodworking. .03 is simply ridiculous. don't worry about it. a 1/16 might warrant correcting, but I wouldn't bother (from your description it sounds like there is some sag in the middle fothe table). I'd make a couple of test cuts, and see how accurate they are. if it does need correcting, you can slip some shims under the cross bars under the surface.
as to tapping the fence, it should work, but what I dis is make a saddle that slips over the top and has clamps that tighten on the right side of the fence to hold it in place. Has the benefit of being able to fit anywhere along the fence, not just where the holes are, and is easily duplicated for other jigs....
-_JD

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On Sun, 30 Apr 2006 19:33:04 -0700, "Kevin Coleman"

well within tolerance and certainly suitable and functional

Unless you intend to make a new one out of completely moisture stable material or keep it in a completely climate controlled environment, it will probably have some seasonal bow also.

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It's a "Biesemeyer" and yes, the fence is NOT straight.
That's because the fence is a piece of metal to which two pieces of laminated plywood are bolted.
To test this theory...
Using a dial indicator that runs down the miter slot, observe the dial indicator with the tip touching the fence for the entire length of the fence.
You "might" find a flat, straight Biesemeyer but you are going to be looking for quite a while.
If the saw cuts straight with no burning or binding, get on with your life.
The extension table is designed to hold material for very brief periods. Does it interfere with the fence movement ??? If so, build a new and flatter extension table.
The Delta tables are made from laminated MDF. Will they bow ??? YES.... Will it matter ??? NO ...
Kevin Coleman wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net says...

My Powermatic 66 fence is not perfectly straight all the way down its length either. There are small "dips and bulges" all the way down that makes the runout guage vary a little, but no more than 3-5 thousandths. However, the back and front ends are almost exactly "on". I just set the back end relative to the front end to toe out about 0.005". That accounts for the biggest "bulge". Cuts are smooth, no binding, no burning and even on a 4 foot rip, the board edges are parallel to +- 1/64th, perhaps less. That's about as close as my eyes can measure.
Kevin, as was pointed out above, if there's no binding or burning, then great. However, if the edges of a board are out of parallel as much as 1/32" I'd be displeased. I build furniture and 1/32" is about half the width of the Grand Canyon. But, then, 1/32" is not critical to a lot of projects nor to a lot of people.
Tex
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"Kevin Coleman"

snip
Other posters have answered the accuracy issue. However, for tapping the top of your fence. Its too thin to tap. Drill and use RIVNUTS. Or drill a larger hole on the bottom and use nuts and bolts. Or make a bolting plate that slips in from the end. Dave
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Tom Tomlin's Table Saw book uses a biesemeyer fence and he did just that and uses a lot of attachments that he made for it. They all work great I have made most.

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