Bi-fold closet doors

Want to install bi-fold doors (4 panels total) on a closet 4 feet wide but only 59 inches high. Standard doors are all 80 inches. While I've taken off a few inches off the width in the past, I've never removed 20 inches from the height.
Does anybody make shorter doors? Do I have to make my own? Rental unit so style not that important.
Ivan Vegvary
(Cross posted to alt.home repair)
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Ivan Vegvary wrote:

What do you mean do you have to? Is that a joke? : )
I used a cloth shower curtain in front of a closet for a few years and it worked fine (for the circumstances).

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On 3/16/14, 10:56 PM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

If you're talking about those cheap, light, luan, hollow doors with the cardboard torsion box interior, then yes, it's pretty easy. I've done this a few times.
They have a pine frame around the perimeter made of what could best be explained as a 2x4 ripped in half. There will some more blocking of the same material where the door handles go. The rest of the interior is a honeycomb torsion box of cardboard.
If you want to keep the door handles where they normal would be, then cut the 21" off the top of the doors. Luan is nasty, messy stuff that puts long painful splinters in your hands, so I recommend gloves. You can do it two ways. Make your final clean cut at 59" using proper techniques to avoid splintering/tear-out. Or make a cut a blade width long and clean it up later, once you glue the frame back in the bottom. On to that...
Once you cut the 21" off the top, you can start to remove the top horizontal part of the frame from the luan veneer. You don't have to be gentle. Scrape all the excess glue off the pine frame piece so it will slide in the hollow, cut end of the other section of door.
Clean out enough of the cardboard torsion box so that the pine frame section can slide up into it. The cardboard will scrape right off the luan with a putty knife. You may have to cut the pine frame piece to a shorter length if it ran the entire width of the door. It doesn't have to me exact. In fact, cut it a little shy to make it easier to cram back between the veneers. Glue the inside of the veneers and the pine frame piece, cram it in there and clamp for an hour.
If you cut the door to 59" exact, you're done. If not, now cut the door to it the final 59" length, again, using proper techniques to avoid splintering and tear-out.
--

-MIKE-

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wrote:

I've done a number of doors recently as part of a basement remodeling job. The new inexpensive doors no longer have a pine frame. They now have a pressed cardboard frame that's only about 1.5" in height. Mike's instructions still work fine though.
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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On 3/17/14, 11:20 AM, Nova wrote:

Wow! Don't let those suckers get wet.
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-MIKE-

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On 3/16/2014 11:56 PM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

Louvered shutters, maybe?
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