Best way to make a dado

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If I were to build a bookshelf and need a dado in the middle of each side to hold a shelf, what is the best way to do that? Can I do it on my small router table using a wall or something for a fence for the long board so it is straight? I made a small dad with some small boards and the dado came out crooked.
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Use the router free-hand. Clamp some straight edges to the work piece such that the router base rides between the two straight edges. Use a straight cutting bit smaller than the thickness of your shelf, make two passes, that is, one pass down each straigth edge.
brian
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such that the router base rides between the two straight edges. Use a straight cutting bit smaller than the thickness of your shelf, make two passes, that is, one pass down each straigth edge. brian
Yep. Andy
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How do I control the depth of the cut?
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Do you know how to use a router?
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To be honest, I just got my router and table for Christmas. I have only used my router with a table. I have never used one freehanded. It seems like a hassel to have to take it off the table and back on several times too. Leon wrote:

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That's why you need at least two routers.
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Chuck Taylor
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Chuck Taylor wrote:

Or five or six. ;-)
Glen
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stryped wrote:

Yes, it is. Proper work flow cuts down on repeated setups, but it can be annoying, regardless.
You should check out some books from the library on how to use a router, see if you get The Router Workshop on the tube and generally investigate what you are using. It's a great tool but it can be dangerous and/or expensive (wasted wood) if used improperly.
R
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Great. The router is a valuable tool. Basically the depth adjustment is made that same as it is in the router table providing you are not using a router lift of some type to make depth adjustments while it is in the table. Take a look again at your owners manual to see how to properly make height adjustments while the router is being used free hand. And yes, it is a hassle to use the router under the table and out from under the table. That is why you will sooner or later own 4 or 5 routers. :~)
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It is. What I do is to have a separate base that is permanently attached to the table. All I have to do is switch the motor. Many people have two (or more) routers so they don't have to switch.

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On 3/2/2006 1:42 PM stryped mumbled something about the following:

Another one I'll archive for you. Can't let people know how many questions you ask without doing any research.
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Odinn
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Yaaay, Odinn! Tom (Fancy-lad #8)
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Odinn wrote:

Here, lemme help ya:
;; ANSWER SECTION: 211.6.135.216.in-addr.arpa. 86400 IN PTR client003.c020924.customers.cinergycom.net.
er
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email not valid

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Instruction maunual for the tool?
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stryped wrote:

By how hard you push down. How else?
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dadiOH
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On 3/2/2006 11:04 AM stryped mumbled something about the following:

And since you don't want this one archived, I'll archive it for you as well.
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Odinn
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stryped wrote:

BE the bit...
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Just do it...
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This is always a tricky procedure. After years of trying different methods I finally came up with this one. Its based on an epsiode of "This Old House" where Norm used two step ladders and a Band Saw on a mobile base to cut a curve design on a trelis (sp?).
Step 1. suspend your piece of wood between two saw horses. If you don't have saw horses, substitute something similar. Note, don't use real horses. They spook to easy, don't ask me how I know that... Make sure you place the side of the board you want the dado on facing down.
Step 2. Put your straight cutting bit in your mobile router table and adust the depth to your required needs. Oh, and yes its critical that the router table is mobile. If you don't have a mobile router station, go a google search for plans. Just make sure they one you pick doesn't require any dados or you'll be screwed.
Step 3. Adjust the height of your board on the saw horses to be just slightly higher than the surface of your rounter table. You might want to use a dial caliper and feeler guages for this. After a couple of times you'll be able to just eye ball it.
Setp 4. Take an edge jointed board about 8' long and place it perpendicular to your board in the saw horses. This is going to be your track for your mobile router table, so its important that it be both perfectly square to your board and aligned properly laterally. I modified an old sun dial I won on Ebay for this exact purpose and she works like a charm. Once I've got it in position I like to use tapicon screws and secure the track to the floor. Some don't like to do this, but I think its a bit safer this way.
Step 5. This is where it starts to get tricky to describe... Line up your mobile router station at the start of your guide track (the one you just screwed to floor in step 4).
Step 6. Now make sure you read this, because this is critical... Make sure you got a long extention cord, 30' atleast to attach to your router. If you get one thats too short you could lose power at the wrong time and screw up your work and no one wants that! ;-)
Step 7. Start pushing! Did you watch any of the winter Olympics? In paticular the Bobsled event? Yes, perfect! You want to haul ass like the guy at the back, they call him the brake man. Funny that, my friends call me the Break Man, no idea why though... Make sure you keep it on the guide track and what ever the hell you do, let go before you hit your board. You might knock it out of alignment and screw up your piece if you don't.
The great thing about this method is that you can gang up multiple boards edge to edge and do whats called a "Production run". I guess now you know where the "run" part comes from eh?
Good Luck!
Break Man
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