Bedroom Bed Post Caps

I spent the after noon making these caps, the bottom rounded piece is cherry and the upper pyramid shaped piece is red oak. None are finished or attached to each other yet.
To point the top oak pieces I tilted the TS blade to 12 degrees, set the fence to 3/8", and ran the pieces through, resaw style. Fortunately all setting were perfect and the points on top were "pointed'" on the first try. If any of you have done this before you know full well that if the fence is too far from the blade you end up with a flat point, too close and you get a funky top.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/4185620737/sizes/o/in/set-72157622991960362 /
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/4185620687/sizes/o/in/set-72157622991960362/
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Leon wrote:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/4185620737/sizes/o/in/set-72157622991960362 /
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/4185620687/sizes/o/in/set-72157622991960362/ Artistic!
(You're gonna have to keep an eye on that artsy fartsy tendency, there Bubba!) :)
Just kidding ... your work is something for the rest of us to shoot for, Bro!
Very nicely done.
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Last update: 10/22/08
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I decided I wanted to tie the lower cherry section in with the curved cherry handles on the towers and yet to be made lower drawers under the bed.

Muchie Garcia!
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Very nice. We like to play with contrasting hardwoods too. All of the trim and cabinets in our new house is red oak. We have done moldings in dark red and the oak floors are natural. We have used the natural color as an accent on the stairway, fireplace and built in bookcases, etc. It gets a lot of second looks and then compliments.
RonB RonB
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wrote:

Very nice. We like to play with contrasting hardwoods too. All of the trim and cabinets in our new house is red oak. We have done moldings in dark red and the oak floors are natural. We have used the natural color as an accent on the stairway, fireplace and built in bookcases, etc. It gets a lot of second looks and then compliments.
RonB RonB
Thank you Ron. Right now the towers have cherry and oak and I am patiently waiting for the cherry to darken. 1 month down and counting. ;~)
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On Mon, 14 Dec 2009 20:07:23 -0600, the infamous "Leon"

Ammonia, baby! (Lock the dogs in there for a week? <har>)
Or UV lamps, I've heard. (protect your eyes!)
-- Every day above ground is a Good Day(tm). -----------
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/4185620737/sizes/o/in/set-72157622991960362 /
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/4185620687/sizes/o/in/set-72157622991960362 /
Where are you going to store your belts now?
Good work Leon.
Speaking of fence post tops, I was at the borg the other day and saw some solar powered fence post tops. They had four tiny solar panels to power a light inside of the top. So that the post tops glow in the dark! Which I thought to be rather odd. If you needed some kinda solar powered light, there are many models to choose from. The light produced from one of these units would be almost nothing.
But then again, It was a GREEN product. So all these idiots could buy it and think they are helping the planet.
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news:00a2c151$0$26793>>

;~0 Oh nooooooooooo.....
Man! I had to go back and reread what I wrote. I figured I actually typed fence posts... LOL

Thank you sir.
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Leon wrote:

Even if the saw is level? :)
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dadiOH
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LOL, Even if the saw is level. IIRC if the fence is too close the points will be off center with focus drawn to the last cut. Instead of 2 straight lines intersecting in the middle you have 4 lines that meet at different points off center.
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You are twisting my brain a bit but I think it will always center itself won't it? at least across parallel sides. So if the piece is perfectly square than you will always get a pefectly centered point.
Case: Take a long piece of stock 2" thick by 4" wide by 1 foot long. Rake the blade over to say 15 degrees and do a first long cut standing the stock on edge making sure the cut depth of cut crosses the center line of the 4 " side, say 2 1/2 inches, leaving 1 1/2" of flat. Then roll the piece end for end and pass it through again. The new cut essentially miters the piece and the ridge will be at the exact center. There is no material left for it to move the ridge beyond the center line.
Am I crazy?

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You are twisting my brain a bit but I think it will always center itself won't it? at least across parallel sides. So if the piece is perfectly square than you will always get a pefectly centered point.
Case: Take a long piece of stock 2" thick by 4" wide by 1 foot long. Rake the blade over to say 15 degrees and do a first long cut standing the stock on edge making sure the cut depth of cut crosses the center line of the 4 " side, say 2 1/2 inches, leaving 1 1/2" of flat. Then roll the piece end for end and pass it through again. The new cut essentially miters the piece and the ridge will be at the exact center. There is no material left for it to move the ridge beyond the center line.
Am I crazy?
Actually you are absolutely correct! I stand corrected. I had to go try the experiment out again but heading out to the shop I was wondering that if your statement was true how did I get less than espected results previousely.
I just made the 4 cuts again with the blade cutting well into the upper half and by golley it all came out centered.
HOWEVER my piece was not square and what I end up with was 4 lines heading to the "general" center of the blank. The result was similar to looking at a rectangle roof that slants down on all sides at the same angle. that is probably what I was remembering from the past. For the lines to come to the same center point in this rectangular piece I would have had to change the angle of cut for opposite pairs. Had the piece been square I would have had the single point.
Thanks for making me rethink and redo.
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wrote:

They look good. I did something similar a few years ago but used a large cove style molding around the angled cap pieces. I wanted the same angle on the top of the cove to make my cap look a little larger. Once I got the tops cut I used one to get the angle laying flat and ripped the cove with the same angle. The cove fit great and just made the angle a little longer than my cap piece allowed.
Mike O.
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Thanks. Actually I am already considering chamfering/beveling the top perimeter of the lower cherry piece. I am thinking that it looks too thick as compared to the top pointed oak piece. I'll have to try that out on the extra pattern piece.
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wrote:

I'm not sure how you would get your angle on the curved cherry piece. Maybe the angle first then the curve...?
Here's a link to my finished post. You can see where the molding meets the cap piece. The total rise is only about 1 3/8" although the angle of the picture makes it look like a lot more than that.
http://i938.photobucket.com/albums/ad226/woody-1000/IMG_0371_1.jpg
Here's a picture of the home-made molding. The cove was cut first on the table saw, then the top angle, then the bottom half of the cove ripped narrower and finally routed.
http://i938.photobucket.com/albums/ad226/woody-1000/IMG_0373.jpg
Mike O.
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Here is the way it was,
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/4185620687/sizes/o/in/photostream /
And now with the chamfered curved cherry piece
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/4191567592/sizes/o/in/photostream/
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wrote:

Looks good. Did you take your cherry pieces to the router to get the angle?
Mike O.
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Yeah router table, bevel bit with pilot bearing.
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