bandsaw won't cut straight

I just got an 20-year old Craftsman bandsaw. It's in perfect mechanical condition except for the fact that when ever I cut something it cuts of to the left. I've tried to adjust what's adjustable, but nothing helps.
I'm new to bandsaws so I don't know what the reason for this is. Do I just need to get a new blade?
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That will help.
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Do a search on this site for the word "lead" as in blind leading the, and you'll get the idea that almost all blades lead. If it cuts fine, compensate.
Library a good place to pick up information on the peculiarities and safety considerations for your new saw.

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"George" wrote ...

It's also known as drift.
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"vidar" wrote in message

Almost all bandsaw BLADES do this some degree. It is more a property of the blade than the bandsaw itself. It's also called "drift" and you generally adjust the fence to compensate for it. The following will help:
http://www.rd.com/americanwoodworker/articles/200008/main/page4.html
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On 9 Jun 2004 12:29:40 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@brekkes.us (vidar) wrote:

If the blade is old, then it's probably wise to replace it, since you don't know what kind of condition it's in. Bandsaw blades are relatively cheap so it's not a big investment.
As others have pointed out, you need to adjust for drift or lead, and the AWW page explains it pretty well. But if you're new to bandsawing, I recommend you pick up a copy of Mark Duginske's Bandsaw Handbook. It will explain about the lead corrections and a whole lot more that's really good to know.
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David J. Marks tuned a bandsaw on the DIYNetwork show "WOOD WORKS" one episode.
The link to the episode is: http://www.diynet.com/diy/shows_wwk/episode/0,2046,DIY_14350_26950,00.html
Unfortunately, it's not slated to be shown again at the moment, but it should appear on the schedule again sometime. This might have also been the episode where he blanced a nickel on his jointer...Hee Hee Unfortunately, foor those of you who do not have satellite, DIY may not be available on your cable system.
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L Anthony Johnson

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snipped-for-privacy@brekkes.us (vidar) wrote:

A Timberwolf blade will cut straight but most blades drift so you will have to compensate in those cases. Personally I prefer to go with the Timberwolf blades even though they break easily.
Ken Muldrew snipped-for-privacy@ucalgazry.ca (remove all letters after y in the alphabet)
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Every Timberwolf blade I've used has a slight lead. Others have posted zero lead but the rip fence is adjusted so I really don't care.
On Thu, 10 Jun 2004 17:59:41 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@ucalgazry.ca (Ken Muldrew) wrote:

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Anyone tried playing with the tracking, like making the blade ride a bit higher on the tire?
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Don't see how it would help blade lead, and could hurt the belt. The flat part of the blade (less the teeth) should be about centered. With the entire blade centered the teeth can cut the belt. Another thing that effects (or magnifies) drift is the BS alignment. Some books only have you check one dimension (instead of 3) for wheel alignment. Finally, if you cut arcs in the same direction in many pieces or thick stock, you'll dull one side of the blade more than the other, and create or modify the blade lead. Gerry
On 12 Jun 2004 04:17:40 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Jimlemon) wrote:

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Don't see how it would help blade lead, and could hurt the belt. The flat part of the blade (less the teeth) should be about centered. With the entire blade centered the teeth can cut the belt. Another thing that effects (or magnifies) drift is the BS alignment. Some books only have you check one dimension (instead of 3) for wheel alignment. Finally, if you cut arcs in the same direction in many pieces or thick stock, you'll dull one side of the blade more than the other, and create or modify the blade lead. Gerry
On 12 Jun 2004 04:17:40 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Jimlemon) wrote:

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