bandsaw newbie questions

These are newbie type questions I hope to get some help with. My brother and I recently bought a Rigid Bandsaw. After assembly, it seemed to vibrate rather badly so we worked on it some. We took small amounts of medal from the wheels (with a drill) and now the wheels rotate much much more evenly. Vibration has been reduced alot but there is still a little. We don't know how much is too much but are considering the following actions; replacing the belt with a better one (suggestions are welcome) and maybe working on the motor mount. It is rubber mounted and we are not sure there is much to be done with it. We have the saw on wheels but retracted; would adding weight to the stand help? Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Also, we are planning on doing a little resawing with this bandsaw. So far attempts have been frustrated by the wood being pulled away from the fence resulting in a banana shape cut. What are we doing wrong? The fence is a substantial aluminum square tube (2x4) clamped with C-clamps to the table. We have been practicing using the stock blade that came with the saw however we do have a 3/4 in blade bought specifically for the purpose of resawing. Blade tension was set a little higher than specs called for. Any help on this?
Thanks in advance. Steve
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Link belts have a favorable reputation amongst the wreck followers.

Banana? As in drift away and then drift back? Or a steady drift in one direction?
If the latter, do a Google Groups search in this newsgroup on "bandsaw drift". Nutshell: there are two schools (1) drift is natural and unavoidable and this is how you correct for it and (B) drift is avoidable if you pick the right blade/tension etc.
I bought a 3/4" blade from Suffolk Saw for my 14" bandsaw with the intent of resawing. I had much better success with Highland Hardware's 1/2" WoodSlicer blade.
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We took small amounts of medal from the wheels (with a drill) and now the wheels

Oh MY! The metal removal won't help your warranty. Oh well!
Are you dealing with vibration in terms of shaking or a buzzing sound. If it is shaking it is likely to be wheels that might have be replacable under warrant y(bondo?) If it is a buzzing, it is likely loose covers, part or stability. In addition to wheel retraction on the base, are you sure the saw is setting firmly on the base itself at all corners.
Resawing with a band saw is not like ripping on your table saw. Drift can be caused by several things like blade tension adjustment, height of the blade guide above stock, technique, the blade you are using and the fact that resawing requires a little more attention. Wider blades are suitable for resawing. The main thing I had to get used to is just concentrating on the blade, vs cut-line and correcting. If your saw has a resaw-post on the fence it helps with the corrections. If not your can easily clamp a makeshift post on to the fence to help. I have even used the upper edge of a large C-clamp itself when resawing smaller stock.
Don't get discouraged. All shop tools have personality and you are getting acquainted with your band saw. Great machines with a little practice.
Ron

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On Wed, 01 Sep 2004 09:22:33 -0400, Steven Laughmiller

Vertical banana ?
This is called barrelling, and is caused by running a thicker blade than your saw can tension. I doubt very much if your saw's frame and spring can cope with 3/4", and even 1/2" may be pushing it.
Try a _thinner_ blade. It'll deflect backwards instead. Looks weird, but you get a flatter cut.
I suggest a copy of Duginske's "Bandsaw Handbook" too
--
Smert' spamionam

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From his discription, I agree it's likely barreling. However, he didn't say the BS size, nor either the thickness or type of wood, nor the blade type or TPI. Now, the tension requirement is also dependent on the feed rate. IOW, if I put any size blade on my BS and 4 or more inch thick material, I can cause it to crown by feeding sufficiently faster than the blade can clear, and force more deflection than can be overcome by the tension setting.
On the other hand, I've resawn up to 12" hardwood with good results using a Suffolk blade which was adjusted to their recommended low tension.
I most agree with your last suggestion on the book. Sounds like they're just plunging into this and "shotgunning" any problems. It's even possible this is not barreling, but that something else is far out of adjustment. I also wouldn't move to a thinner blade without some TPI considerations and, once again, we don't know what they're cutting.
GerryG
wrote:

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On Wed, 01 Sep 2004 09:22:33 -0400, Steven Laughmiller
......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
Is this a new saw? If so, as a newbie, before you butcher it any more try making sure the wheels are actually rotating centrally etc.
If you are concerned contact the manufacturers or the vendor.
WRT the wood pulling. I am assumiong you can't cut a straight line by using the fence. You may not have enough tension, or you are pushing too hard on a blade that has "too many teeth" per inch and therefore will cut slower. You may have your guides set up wrong. The blade may have a "set".
If the saw or the blade have a "set" then you need to actually "get used to it" and set the fence to match. draw a straight line on a nice straight piece of 3x1 scrap maybe 2' long. By hand, cut along that line. Do NOT try to make the wood straight. Make the cut straight. Note the angle you have to feed the wood to get this. Stop the saw, while leaving ghe wood _exactly_ where it is. Draw a lline alongside the piece of wood. Set fence accordingly.
If it's not within a couple of edgrees, get another blade. The angle will change if the blade is worn by abuse or use.
The Bandsaw Handbook by Mark Duginske.

***************************************************** I have decided that I should not be offended by anybody's behaviour but my own......the theory's good, anyway.
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First of all, those WW'ers who say that a BS cuts wrong or that the tension is wrong and that is why your blade wanders is wrong. They don't even know what makes a BS work right.
Your first step is to get the vibration out of the unit. If it is a new Ridgid BS, take it back and get a Delta. There are a number of other brands that are better than a Ridgid BS and I'm sure other WW'ers will agree. There is no reason that any BS should have vibration in the wheels and it might mean getting a new set of wheels and bearings. The Ridgid is not the unit for resawing.
Second, Contact TWC (The Woodworker's Choice) and get a BS stabilizer for your BS. This unit costs about $65 and is mounted where your upper cool blocks are. There is a grove in a wheel that rides along the rear of the blade. After installation, the stabilizer is moved up against the blade where the grove is and actually pushes the blade forward another 1/8".
Third, ask them at TWC to send you a low tension blade such as the Olson Pro. The low tension blade hardly needs any attention.
When I bought my BS,I was disappointed that the blade wandered all over. It was at a wood show that I started asking about this. I purchased the stabilizer and all the low tension blades for my BS. Then I carefully installed the stabilizer. I just knocked the blade off of the wheels when I installed the stabilizer and installed the stabilizer where the upper cool blocks were. ( Can you believe I was looking for better cool blocks or something that would replace the carbon ones in the new unit) Well after I got the stabilizer on, I opened up the 1/4" Olsen low tension blade and snapped it on over the wheels. You could see that the wheels moved against a spring that was tightened with the tensioner so I just moved the wheel by hand. A few times around and the blade centered itself on the wheels. Then I adjusted the stabilizer like the instructions state and I was ready to see how it works. My first project was to cut a piece of 3/4" particle board in half, yes two 3/8" thick pieces. I set my cheap $24 rip fence 3/8" from the blade and made a rip cut through the core of the particle board. The blade DID NOT WANDER A BIT. IIRC, I never adjusted the blade tension. And as I remember. adjusting the blade tension doesn't do anything. The TWC number is 1-800-892-4866
--

>Steven=A0Laughmiller wrote

>These are newbie type questions I hope to get some help with. My
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