Auto cleaning wide belt sanders?

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Folks, does anyone know of a manufacturer of wide belt sanders (say 20-24') that has an automatic cleaner for the belt. Something like a crepe rubbing stick that tracks back and forth across the belt. If anyone knows of such a device, please e-mail me directly with the pertinent information.
TIA. James Johnson
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"James Johnson" wrote:

20-24')
rubbing
IMHO, if a belt has started loading up, it's time to change the belt, not trying to screw around with an eraser to try to clean it.
Sanding materials are considered as disposable cutting tools, aren't they?
Lew
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disposable, yes, but the operative word is cutting. dispose of them when they get dull, not when they get dirty. the OP's idea of tracking a rubber cleaner might be worth pursuing, but I think I see a curve of diminishing returns with horsepower going that route. what I do is not let them get glazed dirty- as soon as they get any buildup change out the belt. clean the dirty ones by a 10 minute soak in hot water with a little laundry soda followed by a quick scrub with a stiff nylon brush and hang to dry.
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On Aug 23, 12:12 am, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I used to sandblast them. Two minutes in the cab, and they were good as new.
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Never tried sandblasting them... How much did it change the grit of the paper? What medium where you using.
Right now I take the paper off and throw several of them in a bucket of hot water and then hang them on the side of my traier and pressure wash them.
wrote:

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Sand. No noticeable change.

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"HotRdd" wrote:

of hot

them.
When you can buy 6", H&L disks in the $0.21-$0.23 range, why would you bother?
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote: | "HotRdd" wrote: | || Right now I take the paper off and throw several of them in a || bucket of hot water and then hang them on the side of my traier || and pressure wash them. | | When you can buy 6", H&L disks in the $0.21-$0.23 range, why would | you bother?
Eh? Do you use 6" H&L disks on your wide belt sander?
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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"Morris Dovey" wrote:

Actually, I use a commercial drum sander for such tasks.
They have a 75HP unit that handles 48" wide material.
Why try to reinvent the wheel?
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote: | "Morris Dovey" wrote: | || Eh? Do you use 6" H&L disks on your wide belt sander? | | Actually, I use a commercial drum sander for such tasks. | | They have a 75HP unit that handles 48" wide material. | | Why try to reinvent the wheel?
I dunno - but I'm certainly glad we cleared that one up. :-D
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

I totally agree for smaller discs. For 12" and wide stuff, the eraser is helpful.
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I go to thrift stores, and buy old crepe soled shoes for a quarter or so, then bandsaw off the tops, and use the soles to clean belts with. It works really well. Steve
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So are X-Acto blades, but I always rehone and strop them when they go dull. Decent steel, easy to make sharper than new.
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I wrote:

belt,
aren't
"Father Haskell" wrote :

Just curious, how do you resharpen sanding grit once the edge is gone?
Lew
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Most of the time if the belt is loaded up it is not dull simply loaded up with sticky material.
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Run a cheap'n'nasty paintbrush onto the moving belt will also get most of the dust off, but for the resinous deposits you do need a crepe-rubber block.
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The edge is as sharp as when you bought the abrasive. What "dulls" it is it's clogged.
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Surely you nave used a belt cleaner, if not you need to buy one and extent the life of your belts, disks etc. many times over. Those rubber cleaners truly work very well and quickly.
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I use crepe blocks and sticks on belts, disks and palm sander squares..
I think you have to use judgment on how often or many times you clean the paper before changing it again, though..
I remember Darrell Feltmate's sanding tutorial saying something like "you can clean sand paper, but you can't sharpen it"..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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mac davis wrote:

You can't sharpen it but aluminum oxide abrasive is hard enough to cut hardened steel. On most woods it clogs a lot faster than it dulls.
--
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--John
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