Attach new top to old table base


A few weeks ago, SWMBO was talking to me about the table in our room. She wants to be able to do her scrapbook thing on it, but the surface is too rough to write on. Up to now, it hasn't been a problem because its main function has been as a depository for miscellaneous crap. The top had splits along the glue lines and boards that didn't line up at the surface, so it wasn't much good for writing on. In retrospect, I might have saved money and certainly time had I gone to the local glass place and bought a nice glass top for it. But hey, I'm not doing this woodworking thing because I want things cheap and easy, right? So, I bought some 5/4 red oak. I told myself that I wanted practice filling grain. Without going into further details, the top is done and now I need to attach it to the base. Unfortunately, whoever made this table in the past put pocket holes through the top inside of the aprons and screwed into the top all around. Obviously, that didn't allow for much movement, which is perhaps why it was partly in the shape it was in. I normally put a groove along the top inside of the aprons and use a wooden "button" that fits into the groove to attach the top. This would be a cool job for a plow plane, if I had one. I suppose I could use a handheld router with a fence to put in a groove, but I wonder if anyone has any other suggestions on other attachment hardware that might facilitate this?.
todd
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Simple, effective and quick. Take your choice. http://www.leevalley.com/hardware/page.aspx?c=1&pP310&cat=3,43586,43588&ap=1 http://www.leevalley.com/hardware/page.aspx?c=1&p@146&cat=3,43586,43588&ap=1 http://www.leevalley.com/hardware/page.aspx?c=1&p@940&cat=3,43586,43588&ap=1
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Thanks for the links, however #1 is no better than the current situation. I still need to cut a groove for #2. (I basically use a wooden version of this on a new table). #3 is interesting, but for me, I think it would easier to set up to cut the groove with a router + fence and use my normal fasteners. I'll have to keep #3 in mind for a potenial future use.
Thanks, todd
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That's a good idea actually. I'll have to keep that one in mind.
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"Todd Fatheree" wrote in message

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Slotted screw holes in cleats screwed/glued to the apron and/or figure eight table top fasteners.
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Consider a "figure 8" table top attachement hardware. The "eights" are screwed first to the apron, then put the table upside down on the bottom of the table top and screw the other hole in the 8 to the the table top. A couple of these on each side of a rectangular table should be adequate., (I hate to say this, but it would be eight figure 8s).

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Yes, use what are called Table Irons or Table Buttons or Figure 8's like this http://www.wwhardware.com/catalog.cfm/GroupID/Fasteners%20%26%20Screws/CatID/Fasteners/SubCatID/Desktop%20Fasteners
Use an appropriate sized Fostner bit to sink a shallow hole in the top of the apron for the larger diameter end of the button to sit in. You can make it a litte deeper than the thickness of the button if you like. Make sure the hole breaks out of the inside edge of the apron, just a bit. Put the button in the hole, countersinked side up and screw the button down to the apron (most of them are countersinked on opposite sides at each end).
You can go with as few as 4 buttons. I like to put one near each end of the longer aprons. You can also place them wherever you need them to help pull any cup out of a glued up top. Be sure to place them where you will have easy access from under the base. For instance, if I am not careful, I always put them exactly under a drawer rail and can't get to them to screw them in.
Now place the table top on your work bench, face down. Place the table base on top of the upside down top. Now you'll see the countersinked side of the smaller end. Use very short screws and your done.
The buttons can twist in their holes so they take up any expansion/contraction. Don't worry about how hard you screw them down, the wood will move them where it needs to.
BW
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I wonder if anyone has any other suggestions on other attachment

A biscuit jointer can cut a slot into which you can use the metal z-shaped table top fasteners designed to fit into a groove in the apron. I don't know if you have a biscuit jointer or if it would fit where you would need it for your project.
Charles
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