Architectural MDF and Plywood in Interiors

The bookshelf would be heck in a saloon/salon.
http://weburbanist.com/2011/01/17/faux-finishes-awesome-plywood-mdf-architecture /
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/18/2011 3:50 PM, Edward Hennessey wrote:

http://weburbanist.com/2011/01/17/faux-finishes-awesome-plywood-mdf-architecture / Thanks for the url ... good stuff!
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

S:
You're welcome. Most of it was avant garde work but the L.A. restaurant seemed stylistically near to the Japanese traditional decorative concept of "shibui", q.v. "Austere, subdued and restrained are some of the English words that come closest. Etymologically, shibui means 'astringent,' and is used to describe a profound, unassuming and quiet feeling." (Bernard Leach, A Potter's Book 1940)" from http://clicks.robertgenn.com/shibui.php .
And I guess if we all had another lodge with no...stuff...we could do shibui too.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Excellent link. Thanks! From some other replies it sounds like that's your web site or that you did some of that work. Is that correct?
I know the Japanese concept as 'shibumi'. And I've heard it roughly translated as the pursuit of perfection done in a way that makes it appear effortless. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shibui which leads to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wabi-sabi "From an engineering or design point of view, "wabi" may be interpreted as the imperfect quality of any object, due to inevitable limitations in design and construction/manufacture especially with respect to unpredictable or changing usage conditions; then "sabi" could be interpreted as the aspect of imperfect reliability, or limited mortality of any object, hence the etymological connection with the Japanese word sabi, to rust."
So we've come full circle, and the oak rust never sleeps.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

RDJ:
Excellent link. Thanks! From some other replies it sounds like that's your web site or that you did some of that work. Is that correct?
Apologies for the late reply preceded by other obligations.
That was good stuff. Some of it wasn't for me or, perhaps, you but for what it was the places it was, it was hard to disagree with the execution. The site is simply one I monitor on occasion.
If anyone is a fan of the unique appeal of found objects or abandoned places, the home URL is a particular mainstay.
I know the Japanese concept as 'shibumi'.
And you are right about that. "Shibumi" is the noun and "shibui" the adjective, parallel to similar constructions like "beauty" and the "beautiful".
And I've heard it roughly translated as the pursuit of perfection done in a way that makes it appear effortless. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shibui
Have you checked the Occidental term "Giotto's O"? You will enjoy that.
It is coincidental that you cited that reference which I looked at a few days earlier. Though it had content, as it built up steam, it seemed to become steam--or glowing, mystic swamp gas. In fact, I sent it to someone else accomplished in the area and asked that he consider a more informative effort.
which leads to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wabi-sabi "From an engineering or design point of view, "wabi" may be interpreted as the imperfect quality of any object, due to inevitable limitations in design and construction/manufacture especially with respect to unpredictable or changing usage conditions; then "sabi" could be interpreted as the aspect of imperfect reliability, or limited mortality of any object, hence the etymological connection with the Japanese word sabi, to rust."
This was a more serviceable treatment.
Though you could read yourself into trifocals on the topic, the Japanese concept of "mono no aware", embracing the "pathos of things", their mortal imperfection, the observer's empathy toward them and his sadness at their passing is worth a look. Many hold this phrase to be a keystone for understanding the construction of the Japanese world view. It certainly informs much of their artistic sensibilities.
"Tokonoma", also often rendered as "tokonoma space", is another referent in the realm of Japanese "spiritual architecture" you will find intriguing if not familiar. Wikipedia has a fair starter on it at:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tokonoma
So we've come full circle, and the oak rust never sleeps.
And yin and yang fill that circle by their dynamic interplay, differing, it seems, from the sacred Western notion of that circle perfected by the oneness of itself.
R
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 23 Jan 2011 23:12:00 -0800, "Edward Hennessey"

That was a nice jaunt, Edward.
-- "I probably became a libertarian through exposure to tough-minded professors" James Buchanan, Armen Alchian, Milton Friedman "who encouraged me to think with my brain instead of my heart. I learned that you have to evaluate the effects of public policy as opposed to intentions." -- Walter E. Williams
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Thanks, Larry. But don't tell my mother. I'll never hear the end of it.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://weburbanist.com/2011/01/17/faux-finishes-awesome-plywood-mdf-architecture /
But nothing like this.
Thanks, good stuff.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote in message

You're welcome.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 18 Jan 2011 13:50:23 -0800, "Edward Hennessey"

I like what you've done with your ceiling, Jonah.
Somehow I believe I'd be throwing up a lot if I were around these spaces/homes.
-- Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air... -- Ralph Waldo Emerson
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

LJ:
That recollects a friend's description of a linoleum pattern elected by a customer of...peculiar appreciation...which he said "looked like someone got sick and polished it."
Hey, don't have to be fussy about stains when you can't be expected to find them.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 23 Jan 2011 23:24:12 -0800, "Edward Hennessey"

Like a Picasso painting, eh? I never developed that peculiar appreciation for Cubist art. And I much prefer Manet to Monet.

This is true, but to always be adding to them seems a bit much.
-- "I probably became a libertarian through exposure to tough-minded professors" James Buchanan, Armen Alchian, Milton Friedman "who encouraged me to think with my brain instead of my heart. I learned that you have to evaluate the effects of public policy as opposed to intentions." -- Walter E. Williams
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

LJ:
My mother used to laud a good housekeeper by saying "you could eat off her floor." When I later paradoxically realized that this praise-- and phrase--seemsedto work even more nutritionally when cleanliness has nothing to do with it, the sound of the invitation "Sit down and have a bite" always worked up a smile. Arty stuff is like that too.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edward Hennessey wrote:

--
"You can lead them to LINUX
but you can't make them THINK"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

R:
I concede I'm not going to remember the quotation right but I do recall the inspiration to take a different look at things it left. It was, perhaps, T.S. Eliot who said something like, "When considering Bulgarian poetry we are remindend that sometimes the very ugly moves into the very beautiful." And how that line shifts depends on the eyeballs.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

At least he wasn't considering Vogon poetry. . . . (Vogon poetry is of course, the third worst in the universe. The second worst is that of the Azgoths of Kria)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 25 Jan 2011 06:05:18 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

Koans are the worst, right?
-- If you can solve your problem, then what is the need of worrying? If you cannot solve it, then what is the use of worrying? -- Shantideva
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

LJ:
Zere's koans, zen zere's koans.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.