Air Compressor Starting Update


Thanks to all for your suggestions. The compressor plug is only eight feet away from the breaker box. Have drained the tank and had the compressor in the house all day. The motor still will not turn the flywheel. I feel it just doesn't have the torque required to start. Could be wrong but maybe one of the two capicators is bad. Does any body have any links on how to check capicators on electric motors? I have tried google and can't find what I need.
Vic
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On Sat, 31 Dec 2005 20:05:49 -0500, Vic wrote:

The capacitors are not that expensive. Get the info from the capactors and purchase two new capactors. Unless you have the right equipment, you really can not check them at home. A ohm meter check will only tell if they are shorted and not if the capactance has changed.
Paul T.
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True, however a motor repair shop may be able to test them for you. Like Paul says though, they're cheap. If you have trouble finding a place that either can or will test them for you, then it's not like you'll be breaking the bank on a guess. Back in the old days of basic electronics training in the Air Force we used to charge up a capacitor and short it across the backside of anyone caught sleeping in class. That was certainly proof that the capacitor was working, though not a very accurate test of its capacitance. Not sure I would recommend you bring them up into the bedroom to make sure they're working...
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Any chance that centifugal switch is dirty? or stuck? The one that engages the Cap when the motor is starting
Doug
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Vic wrote:

If you have a multi-meter remove the capacitors. Set the meter to the highest ohms scale. Observe the meter while you connect it to the leads of the capacitor. The needle should kick up and then slowly return to near "infinite" as the capacitor charges. If there is no kick the capacitor is "open". If the reading remains at a low ohms reading the capacitor is shorted.
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Jack Novak
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Jack, to make sure that the capacitor has a charge, reverse the leads again and the meter should kick.
Ted no(SPAM)vasys wrote:

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Be sure to short the leads together before doing this. If the cap has a charge when you test it, the multimeter is not going to like it.

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