Adjusting bandsaw wheels coplanar/vertical

While attempting to adjust my JET 18" bandsaw per duginske's recommendations, I quickly realized that the frame of the saw doesn't allow room to place a straightedge/level against both wheels at the same time to check that they are vertical and coplanar. I tried using a smaller level on each individual wheel and comparing the measurements but I'm afraid this isn't too accurate. What do ya'll recommend for making these adjustments. The only thing I can figure is to cut a piece of plywood to accomodate the overhang in the frame and use it as a straightedge. Any better ideas? Thanks!!!
--
Jonny Durango

"Patrick was a saint. I ain't."
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Johnny Durango wrote:

That's pretty much what Duginskie recommends.
Before you get too carried away I would put a blade on it. If the blade tracks on the center of both tires you're in good shape. In reality coplanar band saw wheels aren't quite the issue some make them out to be.

Not a problem.
UA100
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A new day is dawning...Keeter and I agree on something!
Keith, try to stifle your instinct of responding with a SA comment, spoiling the effect...
dave
Unisaw A100 wrote:

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Bay Area Dave wrote:

Interestingly I really expected to be getting some flack by now from the more textbook learned wooddorkers who buy into the Myth of Coplanar.
UA100
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Keith, I just read Duginski (or something like that -- everyone knows his name (like Norm in Cheers) ). I TRIED to implement his ideas to a "T", but found that it worked better to track the blade just a skosh to the tooth-side of center and leave it at that. Wide blades track fine and cut fine, and don't wander or do any of those other stupid band saw tricks, so what's to worry about? He almost had me believing, until I tried it his way, and then the factory standard way, which is that the machine is built so that the two wheels are coplanar with no load on them. With a load, they definitely aren't coplanar, but after my little experiment, I really don't give a flying hoot! Am I bad? [No, don't go THERE! ]
Hey, I miss you busting my chops about one thing or another! How's 'bout some grief, man?? :)
dave
Unisaw A100 wrote:

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Bay Area Dave wrote: some snippage...

I can't/won't try and give the impression that I know what is what but what I do know is, as you've already found out, a saw can be made coplaner without a load,,, so what. Without a load it's not capable of making a cut making it a very large key chain. In my case a larger, older Gumby like key chain.
I guess what I'm saying is, the very action designed into the machine is to take the wheels from coplanar to adjust them to tracking the band down the center (center David) line.

At this time/moment, considering the civility of the conversation, that would be insane.
UA100
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wrote:

having set up a few bandsawerz I can testify that if the wheels are WAY uncoplanar (displanar?) they don't track for shit. aligning the wheels isn't that hard to do on most saws, 'specially if you have them apart enough to change out the belts and tires.     Bridger
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mine ARE coplanar; just not when there is a heavy load to track a wide blade. Duginski suggests making them coplanar under load. For ME, that doesn't work worth a crap. YMMV.
dave
snipped-for-privacy@cox.net wrote:

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Bridger wrote:

I'm not disputing that a machine way out is a machine worth bringing way in. Me of all people enjoy a good tinker when it comes to 'chinery.
I'm just saying that I think people get carried away from time to time when someone as learned as the Great Duginske says something. To be fair the Great Duginske doesn't hold a zero tolerance policy on coplanar but he insists that it be present for larger bands. Onna 'count of the fact that I'm not setting my machine up for re-sawing (at least not soon/too many other obligations) I'm not ready to go and buying a wider band for Gumby. I'm using mine, for the time being, as a scrollie.
Now, interestingly enough Bird doesn't go into coplanar.
Having said alla that, the two spots we should be putting the efforts of our idle weekend afternoons (1) is, making the table square to the blade (side and back of the blade) and making the guides stay parallel to the back edge of the blade.
(1) Mornings are spent on line or watching Norm. About noonish inspiration/guilt (2) kicks in and we're in the shoppe, right?
(2) We've spent all this money and time setting up the shoppe. So whadda we gonna do with it now?
UA100
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wrote:

All depends what your saw is, and what shape the tyres are. If you've a big saw with cylidrical tyres, coplanar doesn't matter. If you're using a little hobby saw with barrels, then it certainly does.
My saw (Axminster 350 - stee frame, 14" wheels) was built with rubbish bearings that didn't last 6 months. First I knew of it was when I lost coplanar alignment (top wheel tilted under blade tension) and I could no longer set a narrow blade up to run without it leaping forwards or backwards in the guides.
-- Smert' spamionam
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On Fri, 19 Dec 2003 08:52:58 GMT, "Jonny Durango"
Great big piece of extruded aluminium doorframe (or similar). With a notch in the middle if needed. Not as accurate as a ground steel straightedge, but it's more stable than plywood.
-- Smert' spamionam
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Andy Dingley responds:

Failing that, simply clamp two same-thickness blocks, made from a single original block, one to each wheel. Each block needs to be deep enough to lift the straightedge over any obstructions and large enough so the clamp won't interfere with the straightedge.
Charlie Self
"Man is a reasoning rather than a reasonable animal." Alexander Hamilton
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Yeah - pop over to the Tauton website and see if they've got the article up. The picture in FWW, from a few months ago, showed such a cut-out in a piece of solid wood. Think he took a long 2x4, jointed one edge flat, then notched it to accomodate the overhang.
And like UA100 said - are we obsessing over co-planar? Seems to me, if it cuts well, it cuts well.
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Not that my opinion really counts for much, but I'll mention that I already tried the coplanar set up, and it wasn't for crap, compared to the factory settings of the wheels, which are coplanar with no load.
dave
mttt wrote:

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