A question -- Waterlox on white oak -- how dark does it make it?

I'm considering using Waterlox Original as the only finish on an unfinished kitchen table made of white oak. Certainly I'll be testing whatever I use on the underside of a leaf, but I was curious if the product changes the color of the oak beyond that which would be expected with the application of any "wet" substance.
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I've used it just this way & it will give a very nice, slightly amber tint.
Ladd Morse wrote:

-- I AM NOT PARANOID .. .. .. but EVERYONE thinks I am !! !! !!
<<<__ Bob __>>>
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On Wed, 29 Oct 2003 11:42:27 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@his.com (Ladd Morse) brought forth from the murky depths:

Go for it. It should hold up unless you set flaming pots on it.

No, and AAMOF, it lightens as it dries. It's not quite as dark dry as it is wet. Great stuff. I still haven't used it with enough coats to fill oak pores, but if you're like me, you like oak FOR the pores. It cleans surprisingly well.
-- Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life. ---- --Unknown
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Everything I've read says that the finish is pretty durable, but always nice to get another opinion!

Back in the old days (last month) when I was considering following the advice of the unfinished furniture store to use multiple coats of Zar water-based poly, my wife and I looked at the stain samples and decided to use the stain that was one darker than using no stain at all. Just a bit more of a "golden oak"-type coloration.
Now that I'm pretty sure I'm not going the water-based poly finish route, I'm thinking that the slight coloration of the natural -finish Waterlox might substitute for the stain.
I guess that's what testing is for! :-)
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TransTint dyes can be used in waterbased finishes to get whatever color you want (almost). It is often used to get a slight ambering that oil based finishes provide without the oil based hassle of cleanup, odor and long dry times. Check www.homesteadfinishing.com
On Sun, 2 Nov 2003 12:14:05 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@his.com (Ladd Morse) wrote:

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Thanks for the tip. I'll check out that product if the coloration I get from several applications of Waterlox on the white oak isn't what I want.
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