A 'puter in your shop?

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Not at all. I've been using nothing but Seagate drives now for 3 years, and have never had one fail. (I've got twin internal drives on my workstation/webserver/mailserver that have run 24/7 for three years in a very hot [unairconditioned] environment, another in a separate server, another on my daughter's "play" computer, one in a laptop, and now two in the TiVo and one in an external backup drive. They run fast and quiet and have all been reliable thus far -- *knock* *knock* on wood :-)
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My TWO boxes (8 total over the years) run 24/7, a website and downloading and have done so since 1995. 13 HDs total and only one failed. An IBM 75 gig 3 days after I got it. I have Maxtor, WD, IBM, and my oldest was a Seagate. Three years ago Seagate would have been my last choice.
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Nobody null writes:

Sorry, but I've never had problems with any OTHER brand. Had 2 Seagates, both failed after about a year.
Charlie Self "Take care of the luxuries and the necessities will take care of themselves." Dorothy Parker
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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both
If you're worried about HDD failure, your best bet would be to opt for the older, slower 5400-rpm models (they're still available). Folks want faster HDDs, but faster drives (7200-rpm is standard now) produce more heat and noise. Most oem computers don't handle heat very efficiently, so you end up with hot HDDs and premature failure.
If you want a fast HDD to be reliable, keep your system cool (it helps to have case fans blowing on the HDD).
By the same token, if your HDD fails on you, it can sometimes be temporarily revived by placing it in the freezer for a few hours, then reconnect it to your system long enough to get your data off of it.
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I run twin 160 gig drives in a Antec server case with five case fans and one HD fan and it still gets warmer than it should when the video card warms up..

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mr dancer responds:

Both my Seagates were 5400. Went TU anyway.
Charlie Self "Take care of the luxuries and the necessities will take care of themselves." Dorothy Parker
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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mrdancer wrote:

Just to be contrary, I'll point out that the *only* HD failure I've had in more than 20 years of home computing (ie I don't deal with huge amounts of hardware) was a 5400 RPM Maxtor that took a dump after one year.
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I was in the computer biz for a long time and I have seen hundreds of dead hard drives. I suspect the best pattern would be the ones someone mistreated are most likely to fail. You can be as careful as you like but if the guys at the store were playing soccer with the boxes you can expect early end of life.
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Greg, G. wrote:

Nope, they are hermetically sealed and filled with an inert gas. See: http://www.wmrc.com/businessbriefing/pdf/data03_1/technology/mountop.pdf
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Nova said:

No, they are NOT sealed. Particularly the older drives this thread is referring to. Perhaps you should read your own posted PDF. <g> To quote from page 2, top:
"While some OEMs tout magnetic hard disc technology as sealed, it is sealed from a contamination perspective, but not sealed from a humidity perspective. Air is allowed to exchange through a breather filter to accommodate pressure changes due to thermal and atmospheric pressure variations."
The PDF you refer to is for a specific vendor's new line of particularly high-end ($$) drives, not the common $100 hard drive found in your 5 year old PC. Additionally, I have disassembled dozens of these things for data recovery and disposal, in addition to using parts from the internals. So far, they have ALL been vented.
Not to be difficult...
Greg G.
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hamrdog wrote:
<snip>

Hard drives are sealed and will not be not affected by dust. Keyboard, monitor, floppy/CD drives and fans would be my concern.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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hamrdog wrote:

I got gypped. I have an old, original (non-MMX) Pentium 166 in a mobo that can run the CPU at up to 200 MHz. I figured I'd give that a shot, so I cranked it up. It wouldn't boot. I tried some in between speed too, maybe 180 MHz or so, and had the same result. So it's still running at 166.
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Shawn wrote:

I don't think there's much to worry about there. Paper ignites at 454 F. Paper is made out of wood. I have no idea how the flash point of, say, walnut compares to the typical pulp pine used to make paper, but I would guess it's comfortably above 203 F.
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Ever heard of dust explosions?
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Rejnold Byzio responds:

How is that relevant? Dust explosions in hobby woodshops are pretty much non-existent. I've never seen a citation that proves a dust accumulation was the cause of any such explosion. Vapors from finishes and glues, yes, but dust, no.
Charlie Self If God had wanted me to touch my toes he would have put them higher on my body.
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On 13 Jan 2004 13:00:05 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

There have been a few. The _classic_ one is to throw a shovelful of MDF router dust onto a woodstove. I'll light a pile of it, or I'll throw a wrapped newspaper of it in there, but I'll not tip it in gradually from a shovel.
Another one is vacuuming the workshop with a cleaner that has sparky motor brushes.
It's true enough that you'll not get a static electricity dust explosion from a DC, because the spark energy doesn't reach the ignition energy of the dust, but there are plenty of ignition sources around that are capable.
-- Do whales have krillfiles ?
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Andy Dingley writes:

But you really, really have to work at it.

Certainly setting things up for a dust explosion can create one: I knew one guy who put his grinder on his DC. Nasty little fire one day while he was sharpening kitchen knives for his wife.
Charlie Self If God had wanted me to touch my toes he would have put them higher on my body.
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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On 13 Jan 2004 15:37:17 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

My dad used to have a haulage business, and one of his regular clients was a specialist flooring / panelling workshop. They lost several vacuums to this, whilst vacuuming up gypsum dust (which is about as inert as you can expect to get). Turned out the stuff was getting contaminated with wax from a surface coating process, and it was the wax that was flammable.
I really don't like MDF dust. Damn stuff is so fine that all sorts of sources can set it off.
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Rejnold Byzio wrote:

Yes, but how does that change anything? Wood dust is made of wood. Big pieces of wood, little pieces of wood, what difference does it make what the flash point is?
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So how many people would have their computer in the same room that they do their finishing? What is the flash point of many solvents?
Shawn
On Wed, 07 Jan 2004 18:01:25 -0500, Silvan wrote:

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