A little Milk Paint help please

My daughter requested a nightstand/endtable for her new studio apartment. After agreeing on dimensions 21"square she changed her mind, unsure if it would fit. The table with a drawer and lower shelf was already, cut, legs turned, morticed, edge routed, drawer dovetailed, dry assembled, just not glued. Rather than stop altogether to await new measurements, I asked for a color choice. The table is all poplar since I knew it was to be painted. I talked her out of Home Depot latex and she chose pumpkin colored milk paint. So two coats of milk paint and two coats of BLO were applied.
Now some good news and some bad news. A change in purchase of a couch. The table will now fit with no modification, BUT the pumpkin color really sucks with the new couch. I must now recolor. Looking at a pale green.
I am not sure about milk paint adhesion and covering over the darker pumpkin and two coats of BLO (linseed oil). I'm thinking of shooting the parts with a coat of Zinser BIN (shelac based primer) and then proceding with 2 coats of light green milk paint, more BLO, and wax top coat. This is certainly a lot of layers on the wood.
Other options include just milk paint over the BLO or since the table is not assembled, sanding all down, and returning the legs slightly to get the milk paint off. I will be calling the Milk Paint manufacturer tomorrow for their take, but suggestions from this group would be appreciated. Making a new table or getting a new daughter will not be considered <grin>
Jerry
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Have you seen:
http://www.realmilkpaint.com/unknownsurface.html
and
http://www.realmilkpaint.com/remover.html
A Lurker wrote:

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I know a guy who knows a guy who knows Louie the Lip and his second cousin Tommy TwoToes. They can straighten this whole problem out very quietly and make sure it never comes back. You want I should give them a call? Might be cheaper and easier than getting a new kid.
P
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Just my opinion, so take it for exactly what you get from it.
I would be inclined to strip it off and start again. When I am finishing, I have had all manner of results with BLO as a finish. Now if you put a couple of coats on the paint and left it, you would probably be fine with a simple prime and recolor.
But the BLO is a different part of the equation. While it may be dry to the touch, it may take a few weeks (as in 4 - 6) to cure out. You say you put on a couple of coats - two heavy ones? Two light ones?
With humidity, temps, brand of BLO etc., being factors, the longer you wait to recoat the better. I have put primer/sealer over BLO in an effort to stabilize it, and failed miserably, both times. It simply leached slowly through my primer.
I also see that on your second attempt, you will be putting wax on the finish. (Wax on painted furniture?) Anyway, if you waxed the first attempt as well, it isn't only silicones that you will contend with to get your finish right.
You will also have to contend (depending on the quality of the wax) with just how much waxy resin is left behind when you buff off. Paint/ primer doesn't stick to wax well, no matter how you try to sand it off.
Stripping is the only way to make sure you do it one more time. If you are like me, I would be undone if the finish didn't look right or the pigments/BLO leached through my finish. I would then have to start from square one and do it all over again anyway.
Robert
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I was afraid you were going to say that! FYI, first coat of BLO was light and second built up heavier. It's really soaked in and although dry, your right, it's not cured. I tried getting some off with rubbing with paint thinner and very little is coming off. Three of the four apron pieces can be run through the planer to get all finish off. The top, shelf, and front will have to be hand sanded, since they won't fit though the planer. The turned legs will have to be re-turned. None of this will be fun, but you are probably correct. Any chemical stripper suggestions to get the BLO off as an option?
By the way, I've used this finish with a light coat of Briwax on a Windsor stool that I made a few years ago and it has worn like iron in kitchen use with spills and all.
Thanks
Jerry
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BLO is strange stuff sometimes. Thinner won't budge once it starts to set up, but the other solvents work fine. I would move up the ladder to "hotter" solvents. My choice would be lacquer thinner and some abrasive pads IF I were just going to take the BLO off. Don't use rags or steel wool (this is the voice of experience) as they will dissolve into the syrup of resolvated BLO and get lint and particles in every little crevice.

I would go down to the big box store by you and get some of their chemical stripper. Since this is a new project, I would be that picky about brands as just about any of them should eat the finish off well since it is still green. I have personally had the best luck with the Kleen Strip line of removers.
I have personally NEVER had any kind of luck with the citrus or soy strippers, but your luck may be different. Don't forget your gloves, protection for eyes and nose, and a big place to work so you won't get any on you.
I wouldn't re-turn anything. The stripper will get off what you need. If you can get your project apart, depending on the complexity of the profile on the legs it might be easier to sand them on the lathe, and certainly easier to strip of you can easily handle all sides. The returning would be up to you.

Remember that the things that make your finish wear resistant are the things that will make your project "new finish" resistant as well. Briwax is well known for its high quality blend of waxes. Your particular blend may have a few different things in it, but if you used the finishing wax, it will have a high carnauba wax content. This component is very successful at repelling new finishes.
It is no match for Kleen Strip and its related solvent based strippers though.
Personally, I would strip it, sand it, wash it with a good solvent, let it dry overnight and start again.
Robert
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On Mon, 01 Sep 2008 13:09:14 -0500, A Lurker wrote:

The shellac should do the trick. The casein alkali (or is it acid) might work OK without it, but why take the chance?
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