220v extension cord for Table saw?

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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Ron Truitt) wrote in

Home Depot in the extension cord section. I have a 9' on my jointer.
About $10.00.. WAY cheaper than making one.
Alan
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I have 220 volt extension cords all over the shop. Somebody more attuned to the regs may tell you I'm crazy, I don't know. I just buy the heavyest cable I can find, #12 extension cord or #10 stranded cable with a heavy jacket off the spool. Put a plug on one end and an outlet to match your tool on the other. Run the tool where you want to, not close to where the outlet is.
bob g.
Ron Truitt wrote:

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Robert Galloway wrote:

Hey, Bob, you see that great article in Tools & Shops this month about shop fires? ;)
-BAT
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Brett A. Thomas responds:

And why would 240 volt extension cords be any more likely to create shop fires than would, say, 120 volt extension cords?
Charlie Self "Giving every man a vote has no more made men wise and free than Christianity has made them good." H. L. Mencken
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Charlie Self wrote:

Just a joke, Charlie. Although, FWIW, I'd tend to be a little more suspicious of shop-made extension cords (whatever their voltage) than of the UL-listed ones. No disrespect to Bob's cable-making in particular intended, though.
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Well...if you're using UL listed connectors, and UL listed wire, and using both according to how they're supposed to be used, you're fine.
An interesting side note - coiling of extension cords while in use is a really, really bad idea. It makes a huge inductor (coil) which blocks AC current and generates a LOT of heat. I have a friend who is a master electrician, and among other jobs always handles the power systems at the county fair. He's got more than a couple trophies which are melted-together coils of what used to be extension cords on reels of one sort or another. Power loss is substantial in a coiled AC cord.
That said, I have no hesitation making my own extension cords where appropriate, but I do the calculations before I do so.
Dave Hinz
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fires
Would you be equally more suspicious of shop made wood products than of commercially manufactured ones?
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com
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Mike Marlow wrote:

Well, I don't believe most common wood furniture goes through quite the UL-sponsored torture testing most extension cords do, so I don't think that's particularly a fair question. I also think most shop-made cords are probably not as extensively designed and engineered as most shop-made wood products. And, finally, if I mess up a bench in the shop, it's probably not going to catch on fire. [Pauses briefly to imagine screwing up a bench so badly that it bursts into flames].
Anyway, I was just trying to make a lighthearted comment and apparently have now offended half of rec.woodworking. I'm sure at some point I'll make an extension cord myself and it'll work just fine. All I'm saying is it'll be six months before I stop looking at it carefully everytime I use it - and that wouldn't be true of a UL-listed extension cord.
-BAT
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Before you get too happy with the U/L approval remember they approved aluminum wire, FPE "no-trip" breakers and a back stabber wiring devices.
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"Greg" writes:

aluminum
And the list goes on.
It is a test for fee organization, not an engineering design firm.
Lew
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I have some nice homemade 220V cords made up from 10GA SJ cable with hubbell twistlocks on the ends. They beat the pants off any factory made cord I could buy at the borg. No need to look at them twice. Can you really be that doubtful about your skills and of electricity?
-j
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Brett Thomas notes:

You haven't offended anyone, AFAIK. But, in fact, shop made extension cords are fairly common, both in 240 and 120 volt configurations, and the parts used have--usually--already been engineered and tested. It's a matter of assembly, and that's an individual thing. My hands aren't as able as they were back then, but I used to rewire military helicopters. Those systems were already engineered, but for various reasons (including shitty engineering) problems cropped up and us avionics types had to hunt it down and fix it, often makikng field changes. So I feel pretty competent to make shop extensions, and I do not feel my level of wiring skill is at all unusual.

One good examination should do it. If you assemble the cord of top quality components and do the work carefully, it will show you all you need to know the first time you use it.
Charlie Self "Giving every man a vote has no more made men wise and free than Christianity has made them good." H. L. Mencken
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if only yours were the most offensive comments to be found on usenet ...
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Charlie Self wrote:

Well, it's probably just me. But I did that with wiring in my house and it was at least three months before I stopped thinking, as I drifted off to sleep, "gee, I hope that keeps working..." My two big goals in life are to make it through without going to prison or burning my house down. :)
As a serious question - doesn't NEC kinda frown on "permanent" extension cords? Would it be safer to replace the cords on your tools with longer, permanent ones? Or is this what you guys have been talking about, and I misunderstood?
-BAT
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Brett Thomas asks:

An extension is some of an impermanent tool by its very nature. AFAIK, for hobby tools the NEC doesn't say a thing about putting longer cords on the tool itself.
I don't do that because I need extension cords for various tools I test, the cords are there, so there's not much point in lengthening the cord on my table saw. Besides, what then happens if I move the table saw closer to the outlet, or further away? Extension cords are temporary, can be replaced easily, and are not any kind of real shop problem that I've ever heard of.
Charlie Self "Giving every man a vote has no more made men wise and free than Christianity has made them good." H. L. Mencken
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Charlie Self wrote:

To be clear, I'm asking not to lecture, but because my understanding of practical electricity is imperfect, and I want to understand. I get why _you'd_ need to do that, but I don't happen to have manufacturers sending me tools that rotate in and out of my shop on a regular basis. When I put a tool there, it's because (excepting shop reorgs) I expect it to be there until it dies, or I do.
I believe that the logic behind the NEC frowning on permanent extension cords (assuming my memory that they do is correct) is that every time you have a non-hardwired connection, it's possible for it to work loose. If it works loose, you can have arcing, which would be doubly bad if it's in a pile of sawdust in a workshop at the time.
When I redo all my tools 220, I figured I'd need to replace the plugs, anyway, so I'll make the tool cords be the necessary length to not need extension cords. I'd figured this would be safer and neater.
-BAT
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Go with twistlocks. If your tools aren't moving around the cord isn't going to work loose. As for sitting in a pile of sawdust, well, one end of the cord is in a socket the same as any other cord so there is no difference in safety there. The other is near the tool. Mine are typically off the ground so it should be OK too.
Tools on mobile bases and extension cords are the way to increase your shop size considerably. Mine is now as big as my garage AND driveway.

We have disproved the safety part. Now tell me how it is neater. You still have a cord going from tool to socket in either case. In the case of extension cords you can roll them up and put them away if you want to. I do. It means the kids can't turn on the machine by accident or even on purpose.
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J wrote:

Well, this is getting into a whole other question, but I'd love feedback on this. My basic plan has been to run a dedicated set of wiring for fixed machines (defining "fixed" to include some stuff that's mobile but plugged in most of the time), and to have panic stops and a lockout box for those circuits. That'll let me lock down the stationary power tools when I leave the shop (in case the kids get in) but still have lights work, batteries charge, etc. Anyone have a good source for those kinds of electrical supplies (lockout boxes, panic buttons, etc)?
-BAT
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still
do.
purpose.
Well, the simplest lockout box is your subpanel. Throw the breakers when you're done for the day and secure the subpanel in any way you're comfortable with. You should be able to find a number of commercial electrical supply houses near where you live that would have just about anything you'd want to put in. You can get really carried away with this stuff and sometimes you have to step back and say - hey, this is just a hobby shop - do I really need this or that or the other thing, or is a simpler method a better approach. Personal preference will prevail.
--

-Mike-
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Mike Marlow wrote:

Yeah, that's usually a danger for me. :) But I'm also a bit of a safety freak. I'm sure the price tags will dictate a lot of my design, anyway. At the very least, I'd really like to be able to actually *lock out* the big tools so I don't have to worry about the kids at all. That'll be very popular with SWMBO.
-BAT
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