220v extension cord for Table saw?

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I am considering getting a 220 volt table saw but have 220 volt available at the entrance to my garage and would have to have an extension cord of 10 feet or so.
Is that a problem and if not are they comercially available? I have never seen anything in 220 but am not use to the search.
Thanks,
RonT
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"Ron Truitt" wrote in message

IME, 220v extension cords are hard to come by locally, and cheaper to make yourself. Just use the proper gauge wire, preferably stranded for an extension cord, for the amperage of your circuit, and you will be fine.
For my table saw I made a 15' extension cord out of the 10 ga stranded wire, which is the same size in the circuit to the receptacle. Male and female plugs are generally available at the BORGs.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/04
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On Sun, 28 Nov 2004 16:47:15 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Ron Truitt) wrote:

generally you make your own.
go buy a heavy duty 50' cord and cut 15 ' off of the female end. get a 220v plug to match your receptacle and useit and the 15' piece to replace the cord on your saw.
also get a 4square double gang box with a cover and a couple of 110v receptacles to go in it. wire that into the remainder of your 50' cord. very useful...
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A good electical house will have them, Grainger, McMaster Carr, MSC will also have them if you are in the US. You just get some SO or SJ cord the correct gauge. Hubbell is one brand. Pass & Seymour is another brand.
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Ron Truitt) wrote:

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Howdy I have seen them in commerical wholesale business. Why not make your own. Ten feet would not require large gauge cable. The main thing is 4 wire cable and 220v m/f connectors. 12 gauge wire should be sufficient. Keep in mind the longer the wire the less voltage at the other end.
Ron

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On Sun, 28 Nov 2004 16:30:06 -0700, Rebel \(Ron\) wrote

For a typical 3hp table saw you'll only need 12 gauge wire. Look for sales or buy a 25 foot extension cord. Cut the ends off and install 220v plug and receptacle that corresponds with your 220v socket and table saw plug. You might need to install the receptacle in a metal box with the appropriate strain relief to clam onto the cord. A nicer alternative is to buy the sheathed 10 gauge 3/wire rubber covered (usually black) cut to your required length. One wire to each hot and ground.
-Bruce
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10 guage cable will support up to 30 amps.

3 wire is all he'll need for shop tools, unless he's hooking up a clothes dryer next to his table saw.

Maybe - depends on the current draw of the tool. 12 guage will support 20 amps - likely sufficient for most tools that will plug into an extension cord.

Not at these lengths.
--

-Mike-
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Install another 220v outlet (or two).
On Sun, 28 Nov 2004 16:47:15 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Ron Truitt) wrote:

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Phisherman writes:

I use two different pattern 220 volt extensions for machines that cannot be moved close enough to any of the six 220 outlets I currently have. In many cases, there simply is NO way to move the machine close enough to the outlet. Short cords. Blocked outlets (with wood or other machines). Those are only reasons.
I haven't found any commercially available 220 extensions, but there probably are some. They're easy enough to make.
Charlie Self "Giving every man a vote has no more made men wise and free than Christianity has made them good." H. L. Mencken
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On 29 Nov 2004 09:11:28 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

Many times installing a longer cord on the machine is cheaper than an extension cord. One, maybe two less connectors to buy!
Barry
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On Mon, 29 Nov 2004 11:32:11 GMT, Ba r r y

that's true... I forgot about that... when I had a 220v dryer (yuk!) I bought a new cord for it that was 4' longer, so that I didn't need an extension cord.. (HD has 'em)
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Charlie Self wrote:

Lowes usually has some in stock. Typically though you either have to make up an adapter cable to get it to plug into whatever socket you have in the wall and another one at the other end or change the plug on the machine to match the cord. Or you need to cut the connectors off and replace them with connectors that match your machine and outlet, in which case you may as well just get a 110v cord and do the same. Finding plugs that fit a standard dryer outlet can be problematical--you may have to get a replacement dryer cord and put a socket on the other end of it that takes a readily available plug.

--
--John
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Again, a very informative thread.
One thing which hasn't been mentioned, is the importance of strain-relieves. When using a twist-lock plug, the amount of pull on a 'tripped-over' wire can be enough to break away the stranded wires from the attachment screws. Make sure that the strain relief is suited for size of the wire chosen. Sometimes people think they need to go to heavier gauge wire when the voltage doubles, while in fact the opposite is true.
my 2 cents worth ($33.00 Canadian)
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(Ron Truitt) writes:

Get a 25 or 50 ft, 12-2 /w/ ground, molded cord set of whatever voltage is available at the lowest price.
Cut off the female end and wire into saw.
If not already 240V, cut off male plug and rewire with 240V plug.
It is how I rigged mine.
HTH
Lew
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I found a 30ft cord with molded 120v ends that was cheaper than 15ft of cord. I cut it in three pieces and added 220v connectors to the middle piece. I put the appropriate 120v connectors on the other ends (10ft and 5ft), and have a couple heavy duty cords in handy lengths for other tools.

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They are hard to find. What I did was to buy a 25 foot, 12 gauge, 120 volt, extension cord. Loop off both ends, add an approprite male plug on the one end and completely remove the original cord on the saw an install my new 25 footer. Cheaper as you only need one plug, and no hassle with "one more cord" lying about. Greg
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On Sun, 28 Nov 2004 16:47:15 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Ron Truitt) wrote:

In my area, (central CA), you can't GET them.. I had to make my own out of Romex...
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(Ron Truitt)

ewwww.
-j
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wrote:

Don't you also have to show an id to buy spray paint? <G>
Barry
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On Tue, 30 Nov 2004 00:53:11 GMT, Ba r r y

haven't used it in years, but I think you do, if you look young (i sure don't!) between the sniffers and the taggers, they used to sell a lot of spray paint!
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