Worktop to wall (sealing)

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Hi,
The walls in my kitchen are far from square and after fitting my worktop there are gaps between the worktop and the wall of differing sizes at various intervals along the 3m length. I didn't have the patience or skill to plane the worktop to fit the wall.
I don't know the correct way to seal a worktop to the wall but I was going to seal it to the wall with transparent silicone before tiling. After tiling should I then run a bead of silicone along the tile/worktop edge or will the grout be sufficient considering I have already sealed the worktop behind the tiles.
But now that I have large gaps how do I seal the worktop to the wall or should I forget this and just tile, bringing the tiles out from the wall with large lumps of grout to cover the gaps.
Or should I fill the gaps with something and then seal with silicone and then tile. If so what can I fill the gaps with so the silicone does not just disappear down the back?
BTW, the exposed chipboard on the worktop edges have been sealed with PVA.
I don't want a rotten worktop in 2 years!
Thanks,
John
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John Greenwood wrote:

Depends a bit on just how big the gaps are!
Normally you could tile and then run a bead of silicone sealant along the tile / worktop joint. If your gaps are so big as to be bigger than the thickness of a the tiles (i.e. you wouls still have a vertical gap at this point) then you have a bit more of a problem.
Perhaps one of the worktop sealing strips would do the trick. Fix in place as directed and then ensure that is well sealed in with silicone top and bottom.
--
Cheers,

John.

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John Greenwood wrote:

Don't panic. We all have the same problems.
If you are tiling, then you have the perfect finish to solve gap problems. If you are tliling up to cupboards, its even greater happiness, because you can just skling some MDF between the cupboards and the worktop, and tile over the now perfectly flat surface.
Experience of trying to get a suite of vertical tiles flat on an uneven wal suggests this is a better option.
Somehw you have to bodge out the gaps to get a smooth tiling sufarce. You camn skim plaster, or use board with various spacings of battens, or indeed shape the rear of the board itself to fit the wall.
In my case, the presence of a nice gap behind the MDF akllowed me to run cables where there were none previously, and hide a nasty piece of trunking... In fact it looks to neat, I haven't tiled it yet.
If you have almost no movement between worktop and tiles, no need for silicone either - Just use grout. I am tending to use silicone first to seal, then tile over, and make grout the final fine finish.

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I hope you sealed the MDF before tiling NP ;-P
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Simon wrote:

Nah. I don't spray my tiles with steam and high pressure hoses.
I have extractor fans and insulated walls and central heating.

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That wasn't it ..... MDF is like a sponge and will suck the moisture out of the adhesive before a full cure is reached and won't adhere too well.
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Simon wrote:

? Always worked for me?
Coat of PVA should fix anyway.

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Simon wrote in message ...

IIRC the face of mdf is not at all porous. The edges are though.
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That's quite a definitive statement. Not at all porous would mean that it didn't soak water at all, glass is not porous. MDF is most definitely porous, though maybe not as much on the face as it is on the edge as the face is tighter packed. Try leaving a puddle of water on the face of a piece of MDF ............ and watch it bloom.
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Better still, simulate the effect of wet tile adhesive under NON porous ceramic tiles by putting a wet rag on the MDF and covering it with plastic and leaving it for a day
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Simon wrote in message ...

piece
Neither pva nor mdf will withstand "prolonged exposure" to water. Sure, I wouldn't line a pond with it, but it's a good enough base for tile adhesive, and superior to plaster and most ply.
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adhesive,
so it's porous then?
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Simon wrote in message ...

Relatively but, as you said, glass is probably the only thing that isn't.
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stuart noble wrote:

Concrete isn't if designed with the odd additive. Lots of swimming pools made of it, and boats too.
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Concrete IS porous. Practically all plastics aren't and practically all metals aren't, and I could be bothered, I could probably find a few more things. Concrete would need a plastic additive or a plastic sealer to be non porous.
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Simon wrote:

Er. Thats what I said, dummy.

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well if you are going to resort to name calling ... :-P
you said concrete ISN'T porous, it IS, it's the plastic that isn't, DUMMY
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Simon wrote:

So you conventionally refer to e.g. cake-with-rains-dates-and-walnuts-in, rather than 'cake' do you?
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nope. I call you, i mean, it, a Fruitcake :-P
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A relatively simple task of scribing, place the wortop in position so that it's front edge is equal distance from the carcasses ..... calculate what overhang you require and subtract that from the current distance, then either using a block of wood cut to size and a pencil, or a pair of compass set to the right distance, you scribe along the back edge

tiling
the
the
the second sealant will stop the tiles and worktop seperating and looking ugly with later movement

You haven't said how large .. you might, now, have to either resort to dry lining that section if the gap is too big, or building it out with plaster. Don't try and build it out with adhesive, it won't work.

just
sounds like a BIG gap ...... maybe you should have taken it slower and asked these questions BEFORE fitting the worktop

that's good

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