woodworm

Hi
We're in the process of selling our 100yr old house, and our buyer's surveyor spotted on the one tiny patch of exposed floorboads in the house a number of flight-holes, some of which were evidently 'new'.
This has now translated into a quote for six hundred squids (lifting and replacing of carpets extra) to chemically treat the entire house. This seems a little OTT to me.
Anyone got any -authoritative- sources to say that it would make sense for our buyers to simply wait until they replace carpets and treat the rooms one by one? Or that they should wait until they replace a carpet before having a good look at a room full of floorboards before making a decision?
And is there any logic in the fact that there was woodworm in the exposed floorboards on account of them being exposed, whereas all the other rooms are carpeted and so the adult stage worm can't fly away and infest elsewhere?
Mark Watson Best SF - www.bestsf.net Best SF reviews: classic and current short SF Best SF Gateway: online short SF
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Unfortunately sense or however you like to call it does not come into it They are the buyers and can demand/request what ever they like. You have three options, negotiate, get another buyer, agree to the request. They have the same three options. It comes down to how badly you want to sell the house, how badly they want it. Negotiations rarely happen as they will say take it or leave it. Buyers are in a much stronger position
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I saw a house of hell or watchdog about this. Do you have central heating? Woodworm don't like centrally heated houses, so are unlikely to infest them. They had scammers saying dart holes in the floor were woodworm, and it would be x hundred pounds to get rid of them. (apparently dart holes and woodworm holes do look different to an expert). Also had the "looks fresh to me" scam.
I would suggest getting a woodworm expert to look at the holes. E.g., our surveyor told us the gas fire chimney (in the new house) is not lined. I talked to a gas fitter, and he said yes, you don't have to have a lined chimney if it is not a back boiler as well, so that showed how much the surveyor knew.
Bob
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On Tue, 20 Jan 2004 11:25:31 +0000 (UTC), "Bob Smith"

Anyone with half a clue can tell you the species (down to a handful) just by looking at the holes.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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Is their evidence of worm elsewhere in the boards? Our last house had worm holes in a few tail edges of boards and in the first inch of skirting, transpired it was furniture that had been in place for 20 years. A locallised treatment sorted it out. Dig a little deeper first. OTOH just do it and sell the house, 600 quid isn;t a lot when you factor it in to agents and solicitors fee!
Tony
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Mark Watson wrote:

was when some floorboards collapsed beneath a friend!
In our next house, where there was evidence of old flight holes and some that maybe or maybe not were fresh flight holes, we didn't gamble and got the whole house treated before we moved the carpets and furniture in. Cost 1200 and I'm happy with the peace of mind it gives. Its also a good selling point.
tony
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Woodworm prefers green timber with some moisture. If things are dry and centrally heated, then make really sure that it is fresh woodworm holes showing current activity, but as the previous poster pointed out house buying is a negotiating process and building societies can also impose ridiculous requirements.

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On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 18:24:19 -0000, "Harry Ziman"

Depends on the species. The powder post beetles that do so much damage to furniture don't like timber that's even slightly green. The real chewers of green timber are the longhorn beetles (1/4" holes !), but they only eat sapwood (in most timbers) and they very rarely cause problems (in the UK)
If you're talking about downstairs floorboards, then most under-floor voids will be at a moisture level to encourage wood-boring beetles, no matter how you heat the room above. -- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 19:39:53 +0000, Andy Dingley

Thanks for all the advice - I reckon it's going to be a case of grin and bear it. I reckon we'll reduce the price by the cost of the treatment and let the buyers have the boards sprayed once they take possession (they're with family now, so don't have to move in straight away)
Mark Watson Best SF - www.bestsf.net Best SF reviews: classic and current short SF Best SF Gateway: online short SF
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