table saws?

Hi all, I have been thinking of getting a table saw as am just about to move house and will have a garage this time around, shame but only single. Anyway I am used to making quite a few things but have always been limited to making them outdoors. Anybody have any comments on the Rexon BT2500A or BTS10A or have just seen ELEKTRA TKHS315E/P on axminster tools. This one seems to have a far more powerful motor. Any way looking for around the 300 mark so any other suggestions throw them into the pot. I am looking for something of reasonable diy quality not full time use. Many thanks for comments or suggestions Simon
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simon beer wrote:

In my book, a tilting arbor not tilting table and a synchronous motor not a brush motor (for quiet running) are essentials. More motor power is always useful. Also ensure that when fitted with the maximum size blade, that the blade can be fully lowered below the table surface (for cutting shallow grooves).
Good Luck
Bob
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On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 21:51:51 +0100, Bob Minchin

Agreed. Equally for height adjust by moving the blade, not the table.
I'd also say that good guarding is important, which means a clear plastic guard you can see through, and a riving knife that moves with the blade. Have it quickly and easily removable if you want to cut rebates a la Americaine.

Ear defenders are cheaper though. If you're shaving the budget, then direct-drive and brushes are pretty much the ways things are. I don't see much advantage to an induction motor unless it's also a belt drive.

Up to a point Lord Copper. There aren't many underpowered saws around, but there are some powerful ones that aren't big or rigid enough to make use of it.
I used an Axminster BTS10PP for a few years and thought it an excellent deal for the money. Then I bought some big cast iron.
The BTS10 falls down on fence rigidity. Last time I looked, there was a B&Q 200-quid job that was identical, but a slightly better fence.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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Andy Dingley wrote:

I've grown very fond of the Screwfix 2kW saw I bought a couple of weeks ago.
Out of the box it's a bit pants, but after much shimming to get everything lined up, and a new home made fence (what the hell was that thing that came with it anyway??) it's turned out really sweet.
Has many of the features just listed as essential - tilting arbor, induction motor (but direct, not belt) and blade height adjustment.
All in all, not bad for 160 and a couple of hours work.
--
Grunff


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My table saw is one of these multi function jobbies where the saw used is a circular saw mounted under the table.
It all works fine but it is a pain setting the fence to be parallel to the blade. I was thinking of either drawing lines on the table or maybe fitting some sort of bracket to the fence so it slides along the sides of the table.
What have others done to make things easier to use?
Sean
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On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 10:57:49 +0000 (UTC), "Sean Delere"

Not sure what your set up is but you could try setting adhesive tape measures front and back of the table. Then you just set both ends of the fence accordingly. (Actually the rear fence should toe out a tiny amount to reduce the risk of the wood being cut being pinched between the rear of the blade and the fence leading to kick back)
Even easier would be to mark the edge of the cut at the leading and trailing edges of the table and then use a tape measure to set the fence from this datum point.
Paul Mc Cann
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There are measured tapes already along the edges of the table but it is not easy to adjust the fence to as they are on the sides. I may try fixing tapes to the table top as you suggest as it will make them easier to see.

Another good idea - thanks!
What I was actually thinking of was fixing a guide at 90 degrees to the fence that would run along the side of the table. That way I would only have to set the fence at one end and would know the other end was correct.
I hope that made sense.
Sean
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that end.
Peter
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Peter Ashby
School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Scotland
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On Fri, 24 Oct 2003 10:15:15 +0000 (UTC), "Sean Delere"

You would probably still have to manually clamp the fence at the rear of the table.
Paul Mc Cann
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an induction motor. Both are brushless but a synchronous motor (as its name implies) runs at a speed locked to the mains whereas an induction motor is not locked to the mains frequency (though they tend to run quite close to 'synchronous' speed with a small percentage of 'slip'). A synchronous motor is rarely used as motive power unless the constant speed is required as its torque characteristics are not very suitable for most applications.
--
Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

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snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk wrote:

Guilty as charged Chris. Apologies I should have have written 'induction motor'
Bob
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>(though they tendto run quite close to 'synchronous' speed with a small percentage of

They HAVE to slip.
Steve >
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slip % is quite small, not that an induction motor can get to zero slip.
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Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

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The Elektra TKS315EP, or Dewalt do a similar saw as well as the Sheppach 315GT scroll down http://www.poolewood.co.uk/Saws/bench.htm http://www.rutlands.co.uk/cgi-bin/psProdCat.cgi?cols=2&category=Saw+Benches & Submit1.x&Submit1.y
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I'd like one that would build into my bench and totally retract when not in use as I'm rather short of space.
--
*I never drink anything stronger than gin before breakfast *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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On Tue, 14 Oct 2003 19:41:54 +0100, Dave Plowman

It would probably be easier to build a bench around one which usually means having a removable cover for the saw table.
Alternatively get one with a mobility kit and wheel it out of the way when not in use. (Or put your own wheels on, as I did once.)
Paul Mc Cann
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Can't be bothered - the workbenches are fitted round two walls and otherwise fine.

Being a first floor workshop - what was a bedroom - I've no spare space to do that.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Then build a fold up bench of the main one at the right height and place the saw on it. Then you can store it all underneath when not in use. Or cut out a section of bench and lower it to the right level when the saw is on it.
I have router table which sits on my workmate when it use. Like that it is about at the height of the bottom of my ribs which is actually quite comfortable to use (remembering safety glasses). If you aren't intending to put large baulks through it or full size sheets that height would work for a saw too.
So you could try just sitting it on the bench.
Peter
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Peter Ashby
School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Scotland
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I have a small space, and move mine arround depening on what I saw.
Its especially usefull to be able to turn through 90 degrees.
Rick

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I took the other approach, and have a lid for mine, which makes it an ideal glueing up table when not in use.
Rick
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