Scaffold tubes


I am pretty sure I remember scaffold tubes come with a colour code for Aluminium and steel poles, can anyone tell me what they are and describe them for me?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Aluminium and steel poles, can anyone tell me what they are and describe them for me?
Not that I've noticed. I've bought steel and aluminium ones new in the past and both have been plain 'silver'- the give away is when you try to lift them (not to mention the price- as I recall a aluminium one is 40 and a steel one 20).
--
73
Brian
G8OSN
www.g8osn.org.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How much does the hernia op cost if you buy the cheap ones :-)
Tim

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tim wrote:

Free, but you have to wait for a year to get it...recovering from mine right now :-(

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

past
I thought they came with painted ends? ... something like red for steel and yellow for Aluminium?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Simon wrote:

Other than colouring poles for company identification you will find that a colour code is used for the identifcation of the material from which the pole is made. Certain grades of aluminium are coded yellow/blue. This applies to all metals. In much the same way various gas bottles are coded, grey for nitrogen, black for carbon dioxide etc there is a chart which lays down the coding system. Try as I might I cant find it through google.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

lays
...
I think you'll find that scaffolding equipment is stamped or etched and not colour coded, unless in company colours, with a roll number for steel and an extrusion number for aluminium.
The stamping codes are set for tensile and flex qualities for that particular material, and is set by the construction industry standards. A piece of scaffolding equipment in use everyday would not be able to keep any painted coding for long and this is why it has its quality stamped into it while still at the manufacture stage.
The only time colour coding is used is in the selection of bits by individual companies more than likely using their own colour schemes.
Hope this helps a bit.
--
BigWallop

http://basecuritysystems.no-ip.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Completely unhelpful I know, but we used to have what we called a "zip up" scaffold at a place I used to work. It sort of clipped together and was rather good if you got the bracing right. There were two lengths of pole, and each was identified by a colour on the end clip - blue for the short ones and red for the long ones IIRC. In case you're confused; the blue ones were the "horizontals" and the red ones the "diagonals".
:-)
Hwyl!
M.
--
Martin Angove (it's Cornish for "Smith") - ARM/Digital SA110 RPC
See the Aber Valley -- http://www.tridwr.demon.co.uk/abervalley.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.