Repairing Concrete Floor

I have an 8' X 2' area of my ground floor, concrete, lounge floor with varying depth holes/depressions in it as a result of ripping out an "interesting" 80's brickwork feature that was quite enthusiastically mortared to the floor. Some of the holes are a good inch deep and quite large around, while others are much shallower and smaller than that. They are randomly spread out around the area and are not all interconnected. I have new carpet coming in a couple of weeks. What is the correct way for me to fill in and repair this area of my floor before that? Oh, if it makes a difference, one of the holes reveals the top section of the pipes leading to the gas supply for the lounge fire (not currently in use but soon to be replaced).
Many thanks - Paula
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Paula wrote:

Get an electric mixer, some rapid set smoothing compund, paint the floor with thinned PVA,let that dry overnight, mix up the compound and slobber it all about. Get as flat and level as you can. It will be FINE for carpeting. Let it dry a few days.
Big holes may be filled with mortar first as its cheaper.

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If you had to put 1" of mortar in the mess to fill an area of 16 square feet you would only need a few buckets of mix. Get some dry mixed mortar and a plastering trowel. Mix up half a bucket at a time and fill the dents and dings you see fit, to as near the level as possible. Get a piece of batton -roof batton or any straight length will do and drag the surface level. Any minor discrepancies will be taken up with the underlay.
As regards the piping. If you are planning to reuse them or replace them it would be best to sort that now surely? If the fire is going to be removed not replaced and some alternative method of heating not requiring gas services used, then cover the pipes and forget them.
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Thank you both very much for the instructions! I'll have a go this weekend. I'm sorry if I confused the issue with the comment about the gas pipes. They lead to the gas supply coming out of the wall, where I am about to have a new gas fire fitted to replace the old one. I don't want/need to do anything to them unless one of you told me they needed to be covered with something "special" rather than just throwing mortar straight into the holes where they show through slightly. It sounds as though I can just go with the mortar/compound, though. Thanks again ... Paula
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I am sure there are others who are better qualified than myself to comment, but my understanding is that copper pipes need protection (which may be provided by special tape) where they come into contact with concrete - otherwise the cement will cause corrosion.
James
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If the pipes can be covered with a piece of board they can be accessed in the future with little trouble and won't need insulating but if they are to be buried in cement or mortar then they do need to have something around them to prevent corrosion. Adhesive tape wrapped around it should be OK.
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snipped-for-privacy@ntlworld.com (Paula) wrote in message

Hi
Just brush away anything loose, mix a little sand/cement/water, and use it to fill the holes. There isnt much more to it.
Regards, NT
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