No access to loft space.

Hi all,
The ongoing saga of my new shower! Firstly a BIg thanks that have offered advice so far, I have some good ideas and feel confident enough to tackle the job.
To recap, the way I think I will go will be to install a cold ater tank and a hot water cylinder and heat the water from the central heating loop.
The house is a converted bungalow which has been dormered, loft converted and extended to the side, resulting in a strange shaped attic area which is onlt about 6 feet high at the highest. It lis like a triangle all around the side of the house. Getting a hot water cylinder and a cold tank above is not possible. I toyed with the cold water in the attic (which is nicely just above the soon-to-be shower room) and putting the hot water cylinder in the shower room nicely boxed in etc. However, what would be nicest would be the cold water tank in the lost space above the attic conversion and the cylinder in the attic.
Problem is though, there is no access to the loft space. There must be some space up there, but the pitch of the roof isn't great so there isn't going to be much headroom (probably only 50cm - 75cm) but the space is about 2m by 4m (measured from underneath, so this will be reduced on the top).
My question is (after all this rambling), assuming there is enough space up there, what is the best way forward? I would want a reasonable size cold water tank, (screwfix do some long shallow ones which are only 19 inches high), so this would probibit making a nice likket access panel.
My two options are take the ceiling down and then rebuild, this would leave no access to the loft space if I needed it again. Or remove part of the roof and drop it in.
Both sound fairly big jobs to me!
Any ideas on which is better, shorter or more correct?
Any other thoughts??
Cheera again
Mike
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and
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How about multiple smaller cold water tanks connected together? That would give you the storage capacity, but without a requirement for a large access area. Just a thought.
Cheers Clive
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offered
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Thank Clive!
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On Fri, 29 Aug 2003 20:04:36 GMT, "Mike Hibbert"

Have a look at www.polytank.co.uk
I am pretty sure that they are the suppliers to Screwfix.
At any rate, I bought one of their "coffin" tanks to replace a rather poor circular one that the original builders had used. A nice product as long as you throw away the cheap ball valve that they supply and use a Fluidmaster or Torbeck.
There are a variety of shapes and sizes in their range.
One thing that you might be able to do that I did at a previous house where the shape of the roofspace was an issue was to fit two smaller than normal tanks and link them together.
They must be at the same height of course, but then you put the float valve into one and the outlets into the other and connect the two using a piece of 28mm pipe between two tank connectors located near the bottom. You should really have an overflow from both, but definitely not just the second tank in case the link becomes blocked and the float valve fails.
This all worked very effectively
.andy
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Thanks Andy,
This may make things a bit easier, I still need to get up there and see what space there is!
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