New Electrical Regs

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There's a bit of confusion about the new electrical regs which kick into gear from next April, hopefully someone knowledgeable can fire answers to the following questions.
I understand that the new regs will imply that any electrical work undertaken will require a certificate to be issued. Question is, who is going to be accepted as qualified to issue these certificates?
Someone I know thinks that only NICEIC members will be able to do this job. And a conflicting argument is that you can issue certificates if you have attended college and acquired C&G2391 (without needing to be NICEIC certified) - part of the entrance qualifications for NICEIC is C&G2391. Anyone know the definitive answer about whether NICEIC is an absolute requirement before writing certificates?
A second question is with respect to the test gear that needs to be acquired to perform the tests required to issue a certificate. The two models which seem appropriate are the Robin KTS1610 and KTS1620, which can be seen on this page:
http://www.alpha-electronics.com/offers.asp
Both test for loop impedance, RCD, insulation, continuity and voltage measurement. The KTS1620 adds PSC. I'm ignoring the KTS1630 as it seems to be the canines dangly bits in terms of measuring things you didn't know you could measure.
Question is - is the KTS1610 (without PSC) suitable for testing to issue a certificate for an installation?
PoP
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yes the KTS1610 is suitable
loz

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And how would you fill out the PSCC value on the Test Cert ??
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you calculate it using the earth loop impedance and the supply voltage.
PSCC = Ze / supply voltage
LOZ
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Obviously you meant to write that the other way up, PSSC = Uo / Ze (where Uo is the supply voltage).
It could still be wrong though: Ze is the earth fault loop impedance at the supply terminals, so what you are calculating is the prospective earth fault current. This is only the same as the PSSC in a TN-C-S (PME) supply. On TN-S and TT systems the supply impedance (between phase and neutral) will usually be lower than Ze.
IOW to determine the PSSC at the origin of a non-PME supply you must do the loop test between phase & neutral, not phase & earth, then divide the measured value into 230 V.
--
Andy




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News Release 2003/0133: 15 July 2003
CRACKDOWN ON DANGEROUS ELECTRICAL WORK SUPPORTS GOVERNMENT'S FIRE PREVENTION AGENDA Tough, new controls on electrical work in the home will reduce deaths, injuries and fires caused by defective installations and save the economy an estimated 93m over ten years, the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister announced today.
The changes to the building regulations underline the Government's fire prevention agenda - with the goal of preventing fires from starting in the first place. This was set out in the recent White Paper 'Our Fire and Rescue Service' and good building design is one of the key factors in effective fire prevention.
The Government wants to curb the rising number of electrical accidents and fires in the home by bringing electrical safety within the scope of the building regulations for the first time.
But the success of the new controls, which could come into force by next spring 2004, depends on the electrical industry coming forward with trade certification schemes to test the competence of installers.
In recent years householders and their families have faced an increased risk of injury from electric shock or fires caused by faults in fixed installations or portable appliances. Many accidents are due to faulty extension and alteration work, use of equipment that does not comply with British Standards or misuse of portable appliances.
Properly designed, fitted and tested fixed installations offer protection against these dangers. This is why the Government, having consulted with the public and the construction industry, now wants national safety standards reinforced by redefining work on fixed electrical installations in the home as building work to bring them within the control of building regulations. Parliamentary under Secretary Phil Hope, the Minister responsible for building regulations, said in a written statement:
"Making householders aware of the need to protect themselves and their families from incompetent workmanship is in line with our drive for better, safer communities in which to live and work. The new measures will also raise industry standards and contribute towards our aim of creating a better-qualified workforce. They reinforce the emphasis in the Fire White Paper published on 30 June of greater prevention of fires."
Notes to Editors 1. These regulatory proposals have been developed in response to the Construction Industry Deregulation Task Force's 1995 report which recommended amongst other things that the Building Regulations should address electrical safety and that the administrative burden on builders should be rationalised. The Government responded to these recommendations by agreeing to review the case for new requirements and how they might best be practically introduced.
2. The current Building Regulations for England & Wales (2000) do not address the safety of fixed electrical systems in buildings. For the purposes of Building Regulations a fixed electrical system means those parts of the wiring and appliances that are fixed to the building fabric e.g. sockets, switches, fuse-boxes, immersion heaters and ceiling fittings.
3. The hazards posed by unsafe electrical installations and portable appliances are electric shock and injuries arising from fires in buildings ignited by electrical components overheating or arcing. Installations properly designed, fitted, tested and commissioned in accordance with BS7671 will help to minimise these risks.
4. Each year an average of 30 people die and about 1150 are seriously injured in accidents involving defective fixed electrical installations in the home, including fires caused by such installations.
5. It is believed that risks from unsafe electrical installations have increased over recent years due to:
Rising numbers and variety of electrical systems and appliances in buildings plus increased demands being made on them
Privatisation of the supply industry in 1988 leading to fewer electrical supplier interventions in consumer installations.
Voluntary self-regulation schemes provide excellent support for existing subscribers but do not always reach the independents or small businesses that have grown rapidly in number since the recession of the early 1990s.
6. Electrical accident rates in houses have risen and compare with those for carbon monoxide poising, gas explosions and collisions with glass - all of which are covered by the Regulations.
7. British Standard 7671 Requirements for Electrical Installations: the IEE Wiring Regulations is the principal British Standard that covers the safe design, installation and testing of electrical installations in building systems and it is the technical standard almost universally specified in UK contracts for electrical installation work. It would be the basis for approved technical guidance if electrical requirements were to be introduced into the Building Regulations.
8. Regulations are considered necessary to bolster the existing voluntary schemes because:
Existing voluntary schemes have attracted less than one quarter of electrical
Large numbers of jobbing electricians and the DIY market are beyond the reach of voluntary controls
10. The Building Regulations 2000: Proposals for amending Schedule 1 to introduce electrical safety requirements is available on the DTLR website.
11. Paper copies of the electrical safety consultation package can be obtained from: DTLR Free Literature, PO Box 236, Wetherby, West Yorkshire, LS23 7NB; Tel: 0870 1226236; Fax: 0870 1226237; Textphone: 0870 1207405; e-mail: snipped-for-privacy@twoten.press.net. The product code is 02BR00015.
Press Enquiries: 020 7944 3042 Out of Hours: 020 7944 5945 E-mail: snipped-for-privacy@odpm.gsi.gov.uk Public Enquiries: 020 7944 4400 ODPM website: http://www.odpm.gov.uk/
Published 15 July 2003
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On Sat, 30 Aug 2003 22:06:14 GMT, "BigWallop"

Just how does all of this deal with misuse of portable appliances ?
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Big Wallop quoted:

way as proposed for the electrical regulations? If you break a pane of ordinary low level glass (which might date from the 1940's), presumably you need to replace it with safety glass - but would you need to involve building control or an approved installer? (I am talking about replacing a pane of glass, not replacing the window which of course would require building control or a fensa installer).
James
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On Sat, 30 Aug 2003 07:37:02 +0100, PoP

Not wishing to appear too simplistic [:-))] but will this mean that something like changing a faceplate over a socket will be covered ?
"more honoured in the breach than the observance" should be the logo for these new proposed regs.
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wrote:

According to the NIC inspector I use, you will be able to change the socket faceplate without a certificate but if you change a socket from single to double you are performing an installation and so need a certificate.
Adam
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wrote:

Well let us hope that all 'inspectors' aren't this clueless then.
AIUI the installation of a complete new spur is a 'small modification' under the new rules and as such does not need certification, so changing a face plate most certainly doesn't.
However, (and yes I know this record is worn out), it is this 'loophole' that will make the incident of wrong installations more likely with the new rules as now unknowledgeable people will install spurs for themselves because the cost of having a 'professional' do the work will be unaffordable due to the costs of the new regs
tim .

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On Sun, 31 Aug 2003 16:18:22 +0200, "tim"

I rather suspect thsat unknoweldgable people won't even know that there are any new rules so will proceed as before.
.andy
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wrote:

But it's been reported in the newspaper!
Tim

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Andy Hall wrote:

fail. Gas fitting and Window replacment are not normally considered beginner level jobs. Changing a light fitting is something many people will have a go at, similary changing a bathroom pull cord switch is seen as fairly striaght forward. I just can't see how the law will be enforced.
The only time in practise that the matter is likely to come up against any difficulty is during conveyancing and then only if A) A surveyor spots something glaringly irregular - even less likely with a simple valuation survey. OR B) A culture of getting everything checked (Gas, Plumbing, Electrics, Timber, Structure...) and certified on paper becomes the norm during conveyancing.
--
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wrote:

sorry Andy I wasn't being serious.....

It will be enforced by a solictor asking "have you done any of the following work on your electrics when you come te sell, In the same way I'm having to do for my DG.
Of course, if I were to lie it would be much harder to find out and if I tell the truth that I have but didn't get the work certified, all that is needed is for me to get the BCO to certify it retrospectively. So, as has been said before the much simpler solution is to insist on a wiring check when you want to sell a house.
tim

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I never mentioned adding a spur.
Adam
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On Sun, 31 Aug 2003 12:20:46 GMT, "ARWadsworth"

Unless in a kitchen or bathroom, in which case the new regs apply and certificates are required (okay, so the likelihood of changing a socket from single to double in a bathroom is very unlikely, but it is certainly possible in a kitchen).
PoP
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wrote:

Depends whether it is a "minor" change. If it is a change within the kitchen or bathroom then (apparently) the new regs kick into gear.
Referring to the original post for a moment, just who is going to be c considered as competent to issue a certificate? Someone with C&G2391, someone with NICEIC registration? Anyone who has made a political donation to the Labour Party?
PoP
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NICEIC registration, and possibly ECA too.
Being a qualified electrician won't count, if the legislation matches the draft. Remember, the legislation is nothing to do with improving quality of electrical installations -- there were easier and much cheaper ways to do that (as done in Scotland), nor about saving lives (government's own RIA predicts it will save only 0.8 lives per year, which is just noise). It's all about the government bowing over to the vested interests.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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On 1 Sep 2003 15:03:40 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

That's just great for someone who hasn't been trading for very long.
According to their web siteNICEIC registration requires that you show 12 months history, and they select random jobs from the last six months of work to inspect.
How one is supposed to get even six months of work for inspection given that you can't take the job on in the first place without it being certificated is beyond me. Sounds like a massive closed shop deal.
PoP
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