circular saw recommendations

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Hi all, I am looking at buying a circular saw for occasional use so not looking for an expensive one. Can anyone give a good recommendation of a "bargain" saw ?
Cheers
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http://listings.ebay.co.uk/pool1/plistings/list/all/category20783/index.html?from=R0
try here always good quality saws available,
Alex
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looking
I was in Focus today, and they had a 1400 watt circular saw, in its own case, for 44.95, less 25% off, making it about 33.71 Cannot remember the name though, Challenge? but the whole range was 25% off.
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Gavin Gillespie
Giltbrook
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Challenge is their own brand. I've bought a 1000W lawnmower for use at my mother-in-laws, which works very well and a 1300W garden shredder, which is a little underpowered, from that range, and they both seem OK.
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"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
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A plumber was after one for taking up floor boards occasionally. He came back with a 20 one from Argos. It was a Challenge too I think. It had a motor of some 1500 to1700 Watts too. I don't know how anyone made money on that one; a three inch cut blade costs over half that.
I'm not saying it will cut material 3" thick and the blade couldn't have been much thinner. But even so.
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On Thu, 13 Nov 2003 18:59:32 +0000 (UTC), "Michael Mcneil"

I bought a cheapie circular saw several months back. Can't remember the name, but I think I bought it in Homebase.
Does the business no problem with chipboard flooring. I really can't see any reason to pay more than about 30 quid for one of these babies. Even if it only lasts 12 months it's money well spent.
PoP
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wrote:

<snip>
...<snip>...
Accuracy is the primary reason. Lean on a cheap saw, or try and saw with it set to a limited depth cut, and all accuracy goes out of the window on a saw with a pressed steel plate. Even happens on my DeWalt (spit).
Doesn't happen on my brother's Makita with an alloy baseplate.
If millimetre accuracy isn't important for the tasks in hand, then you're right - not much point in spending more than that.
cheers Richard -- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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wrote:

I'm not usually using a circular saw for accurate work. However the one I've got (and paid about 30 quid for) has a certain similarity to a brick shithouse in terms of its solid construction.
Whether or not it would stand up to intense application I don't know. But what I was certainly very impressed with was the fact that it zipped thru a load of chipboard floorboards when I did a complete loft, and not once did I think "hmm, blade needs sharpening or replacing". It just kept whizzing round regardless of whether the blade was in contact with material. And that for me is a good sign.
But then my previous experience (well before I bought this little beauty) was on the 500W B&D special which would complain like billy-oh if the balsa wood was deeper than a 1/4 inch :)
PoP
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Sadly, I don't have room for a decent (or any) table saw, so I have to slice up 8x4 sheets with a circ saw and a home made jig. Flexing base plate drives me nuts because it doesn't hug the edge of the jig and has ruined one or two when it's cut into the jig's straight edge.

The power's not the problem - it's the accuracy for me. YMMV of course...

cheers Richard
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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wrote:

Dunno !
Cheap tools have their place. If a cheap cordless drill acts up it isn't going to do you much damage, but I wouldn't be that keen on using a cheap circular saw. They can bite.
Paul Mc Cann
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On Fri, 14 Nov 2003 17:06:43 +0000, Paul Mc Cann

True! But on the other hand if used correctly then the possibility of it biting is significantly reduced.
PoP
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wrote:

My fear would not be in using it in correctly as that can cause any tool to bite.
Rather I would be afraid of a malfunction such as a riving knife becoming loose/bent etc and dropping into the spinning blade.
Paul Mc Cann
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On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 07:47:40 +0000, Paul Mc Cann

Just a thought, but if the riving knife became loose (as in still attached but not firmly enough) then it would most likely fall onto the spinning blade, but not necessarily present a major danger, more like a rather nasty grinding noise that prompts the user to hit the stop button quickly.
It's not as if the riving knife is going to fall onto the blade in a way that stops the blade dead in its tracks. Or perhaps I've missed something?
PoP
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wrote:

It would most likley be snapped off and ejected by the blade, possibly in pieces
It could also lead to a kick back. I've had a circular saw (An ELU, so not tat ) kick back on me and it frightened the bejasus out of me as it came very close to my knee whilst still rotating at speed. My fault off course.
And a circular saw blade doesn't have to be travelling that fast to inflict hefyt damage
The point I'm making is that a badly built saw is more likely to inflict serious damage than a badly nade screwdriver.
You pays your money and takes your chance
Paul Mc Cann
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<snip>
<snip>
Paul, from your posts, you seem to be a pretty experienced woodworker.... what was it that caused the kickback to occur, and how severe was it?
I just like to know what to expect from these things, having never (touch wood) suffered a kickback yet.
Enough to wrench the saw out of a firm grip? Was the stock clamped securley (or, as we've all done, secured under a knee on top of a workmate..!)?
Was the kickback straight backwards?
What have you done since that has prevented the recurrence?
cheers Richard
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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wrote:
snip

snip
Its some time ago. In retrospect I think I was trying to correct the cut line and was too forceful. The saw kicked back with a helluva of a jump,and as I was holding the guard up by hand, having just started a plunge cut, when it jumped back the spinning blade was exposed. I was kneelingon the stock at the time
Not quite as bad as the time I was trimming branches across a ditch by using a chain saw single handed.
I slipped into the ditch. The chain saw was still running as I still had my hand on the throttle. I was afraid and unable to throw it from me. All I could do was try to maintain my balance as I fell, which luckily I managed to do. If I had fallen sideways chances are the running chain saw would have fallen on top of me. I was conscious of trying NOT to protect myself with my free hand as it would have proved fairly ineffective against the chainsaw
Somebody was praying for me that day.
Paul Mc Cann
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<another close shave snipped>
aha. bet you won't be recreating that particular set of operating circumstances again then!!! I've filed it in my "beware" memory location anyway...
touch wood, havne't suffered kick back from a circular saw yet. I'll try and keep it that way.
cheers Richard
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 14:26:27 +0000, Paul Mc Cann

True.
PoP
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wrote:

The Skil Classic has been a well known and solid, yet inexpensive product for years. Recently replaced by the Skil Orca, but still good value at under 100
.andy
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wrote:

I got the freud 194mm from screwfix for around 70
It is a bargain but it isn't bargain basement.
It has a cast sole plate which resists flex. I can make accurate enough cuts that I'm always happy with them. It's got plenty of power for everything I've thrown it at. (quite a wide variety) Works fine with the jig I bought (mitre board) and those I've made (assorted)
Very happy with it and the fine freud pro blade (dark red/maroon colour ones) I got at the same time - gives glassy smooth cuts in many materials.
I could have spent less I suppose, but whether I'd have saved or gained anything by doing so is hard to say.
Take Care, Gnube {too thick for linux}
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