Chasing computer wiring (Cat-5) into plaster over brick wall

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On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 21:58:03 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@digdilem.org (Simon Avery) wrote:

Not at 2.4GHz.
Is there perhaps somebody at a suitable point who could host an access point that would be LoS to you and the village?

No, and you'd need to be careful not to stand in front of any of the waveguides. :-)

.andy
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"Dave Liquorice" wrote

Indeed. After an exploratory vertical chase, I pulled off the skirting and chased horizontally to the corner.
Then I went out and bought a reel of Cat-5e.
I'll put a vertical conduit in the corner where no-one will notice.
Thanks for the lateral thinking !
Cheers,
Paul.
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Jumping it at the top of the thread again :-) On the subject of 'wired' vs. 'wireless'.
Nobody so far seems to have mentioned DECT phones. I would be interested in the case that 'plug in the wall' phones are 'always better' that DECT phones.
To me the argument is very similar - do you want to run phone extensions to every room then have to stand by the socket, or would you like to take your phone everywhere with you (including in the garden and perhaps even next door).
Not quite the same because extra handsets cut into the maximum REN on the line, but for useability the comparison is pretty close.
Cheers Dave R
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On Sun, 24 Aug 2003 20:46:40 +0100, Martin Angove

Sorry, I cannot agree with all above although I suspect that hard wired phones are more reliable. Dect phones can easily be used for in-house calls while the loudspeaker facility helps the hard of hearing - at the cost of everyone nearby hearing both sides of the conversation. Also, it is easy for the DECT phones to communicate with a matching base station which is an answerphone BUT in my experience they stop making/selling matching answerphones/DECT phones after a relatively short period (3/4 years for Philips?).     And I certainly find a DECT phone useful when someone rings me when I am up in the loft or up a ladder outside.
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On Sun, 24 Aug 2003 20:46:40 +0100, Martin Angove

That will make no practical difference.

Others experience might be different. Certainly I can detect no difference in the sound quality or volume between my DECT and normal phones. However some DECT phones are smaller than conventional ones and positioning them is (as with mobile phones) more critical than with most wired phones. Some Phillips DECT phones do appear to have low volume levels (but so do some wired phones).

There are (rare) DECT phones designed for hearing aid users. Alternatively you can use one of the many DECT phones with a headset socket and something like the Plantronics M130 headset which works with induction loop hearing aids.

No, DECT operates on the 1880-1900 MHz frequency band. Wireless network, video senders etc work mainly at 2400MHz. Alarms use a number of frequencies mainly in the 400 and 800MHz region.

Mine happily work to 70m, but interference is never likely to be a problem. DECT uses Time Division Multiple Access and has 10 available carriers. There are 24 time slots available (12 in each direction) within each 10ms frame. DECT uses dynamic channel selection to minimise interference. Channel assignment is done by finding the lest interfered channel and channel reassignment can take place during a call. Effectively 120 dynamically allocated duplex channels are available to any DECT device. This gives a potential traffic density of about 10000 users per km 2 without the need for frequency planning.

DECT phones are quite low power, mine usually go all day off the charge cradle and with several hours use a day battery life is never an issue. 10 hours talk or 120 hours standby are fairly typical. Finding the phone sometimes is an issue :-) they all migrate to one place which is always the other end of the building from where you are when the phone rings.
--
Peter Parry.
http://www.wpp.ltd.uk/
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David W.E. Roberts wrote:

Yes, and use DECT as a last resort .

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Hello Dave

I've worked alongside BT and Electrical guys working up poles in darkness during bad storms. Might have changed recently, but they didn't used to be bothered, in fact they were all pretty happy thinking about the overtime.
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Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
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Hello Dave

Ah, gotcha. Looked at that, but it was a bit pricey for my needs - my work doesn't need more than one number. HH was attractively priced at the time (50ukp install) and compared to dialup it's fantastic. I ran a 64k and 56k BBS off it using a Courier I-Modem for a while too.
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